2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Los Angeles Rams

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Los Angeles Rams

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Jared Goff: Goff and the Los Angeles passing attack took a step back last season, but he still threw for 4,638 yards, and fantasy owners are overlooking the former No. 1 overall pick as a strong bounce-back candidate on an offense that will be without Todd Gurley. Historically, there have been low weeks for Goff from a fantasy perspective, but Sean McVay changing personnel from game-to-game based on opponent should help his quarterback be more of a matchup-proof play. Goff is a bargain QB1 going as a borderline top-20 option.

 

RB Cam Akers: The Los Angeles running game seems unpredictable heading into the season, but Akers should be the likely favorite for lead duties after the team spent the No. 52 overall pick on him in April’s draft. The rookie can do everything that’s asked of him—including in the screen game, which might be an underrated weapon this year. Consider Akers a low-end RB2/FLEX option to start his career.

 

RB Darrell Henderson: The Rams picking a running back with their first selection in the 2020 NFL Draft was a bit of a surprise considering they apparently loved Henderson coming out of Memphis in 2019, so it will be interesting to see what kind of role he has in Week 1. The biggest concern is that Henderson has a skillset that closely aligns with Akers, but he’s worth a gamble in the double-digit rounds based on the upside in McVay’s offense.

 

RB Malcolm Brown: Brown scored five times in limited action last year, and the clearest path to fantasy value for him in a possible three-man committee would be handling goal-line carries. Akers, Henderson, and Brown all actually might be values at their respective ADPs; hopefully we get a clear picture of how playing time will be divided in the opener.

 

RB John Kelly: Kelly was mentioned when Sean McVay recently discussed the backfield, so he is at least worth monitoring early in the year. Remember, this is an offense that has helped Todd Gurley score 54 touchdowns over the past three seasons, and Kelly has plus versatility to potentially make an impact.

 

WR Cooper Kupp: Based on how 2019 went, it’s basically a coin flip between Kupp and Robert Woods as the top projected fantasy option in Los Angeles. Touchdowns actually kept Kupp afloat down the stretch when playing time decreased some, but we would think he is going to remain a big part of what McVay wants to do, and the former third-round pick was notably on a 16-game pace of 116/1,584/10 in the first half of last season. Hopefully the emergence of Tyler Higbee is able to open things up for everyone this fall.

 

WR Robert Woods: Again, last year was essentially a tale of two halves for Woods and Kupp—with the biggest contributor down the stretch being the former, who averaged a very healthy 11.3 targets per game over the final seven weeks (compared to 5.9 targets per game for Kupp in the second half). Both players can be drafted as high-end WR2 options with definite WR1 upside.

 

WR Josh Reynolds: With Brandin Cooks traded to Houston, the Rams now have a collection of possession receivers on offense, and Reynolds—because of his experience—may have the inside track to start in 11 personnel over second-rounder Van Jefferson. Especially in full PPR leagues, Reynolds is a decent late-round flier.

 

WR Van Jefferson: If you have patience, Jefferson can be a player that is worth stashing in deeper redraft leagues with the hopes he will eventually start and play a majority of snaps for a team that projects to throw it 600+ times. The former Florida standout is a very crafty route runner that can line up at any receiver spot.

 

TE Tyler Higbee: Higbee’s play down the stretch last season was literally historic—he had 43 receptions for 522 yards and two touchdowns in the final five games—and a small sample size is the only thing holding him back from being in Tier 2 at tight end with options like Zach Ertz and Mark Andrews. The pace is unrealistic to keep up for a full season, but look for Higbee to remain a key piece in Sean McVay’s passing attack.

 

TE Gerald Everett: While Higbee looks like the guy for the Rams, we shouldn’t forget that Everett has made some big-time plays in his young career. The offense leaning more on 12 personnel could give him a decent chance of strong fantasy value as the 1B option in plus matchups.

 

TE Brycen Hopkins: The selection of Hopkins (in the fourth round) is more evidence of Los Angeles wanting to rely on heavy packages in 2020, but the rookie probably won’t make a significant statistical impact until 2021. To reach his ceiling, Hopkins needs to cut down on the drops.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Robert Woods (FantasyPros ADP: WR26)

It’s actually shocking to see Woods is being drafted as the WR26, as he was white hot to finish the 2019 season, and the Rams are going to be throwing the ball around again this year. If he stays healthy, Woods’ floor might be as a low-end WR2—particularly if the rushing numbers (at least 115 yards and a touchdown in each of the past two seasons) stay high.

 

Best dynasty investment: QB Jared Goff

Goff has been heavily criticized since his rookie season, but he’s one of the most accurate passers in the game and has gone 33-14 in three seasons under Sean McVay. Now is the time to get Goff in dynasty leagues, as he is still just 25 and could have a decade (or more) under center with one of the game’s brightest offensive minds guiding him.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Los Angeles Chargers

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Los Angeles Chargers

Apologies for the late publish of the Chargers preview, but there was a power outage at Wolf Sports HQ. For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Tyrod Taylor: The selection of Justin Herbert in the top ten of the 2020 NFL Draft puts Taylor on the clock with the Chargers, but might he be able to surprise as a fantasy option to start the year? Los Angeles will likely have to score for matchups against Kansas City, Tampa Bay, and New Orleans over the first five weeks, and Tyrod’s dual-threat skillset combined with a star-powered supporting cast could lead to solid numbers—and potentially a stronger grasp on the starting job.

 

QB Justin Herbert: Herbert is a strong-armed, athletic passer with prototype size, but he could use some time to develop, especially in a COVID-impacted season. That said, the mobility of Herbert would put him firmly on the fantasy radar if he eventually makes starts, and what is projected to be a conservative offensive system would give him an easier transition.

 

RB Austin Ekeler: Last year’s overall RB6 in 0.5 PPR leagues, Ekeler could take a small step back based on the philosophical changes for the Chargers in 2020—including the switch from Philip Rivers to Tyrod Taylor. People falling into numbers say Ekeler can repeat his 90+ receptions simply because Taylor’s check down percentage is so high, but that ignores that a) the number doesn’t include plays where he runs himself, and b) Keenan Allen could be Tyrod’s default security blanket. If the touchdowns decline (11 last year), Ekeler will probably be more of an RB2 option.

 

RB Joshua Kelley: It won’t be a direct 1:1 comparison because Melvin Gordon is one of the best backs in the league, but Los Angeles lost 204 touches from their former starter last season (in just 12 games), and Kelley could immediately fill the void alongside Austin Ekeler. At UCLA, the rookie proved himself as an all-around runner, and he should be an underrated FLEX if he beats out Justin Jackson for the No. 2 job and goal-line carries.

 

RB Justin Jackson: Jackson’s fantasy value in 2020 will depend on whether or not he’s able to hold off Joshua Kelley, but even with limited time to make an impression on the coaching staff, we would lean towards the rookie. It’s notable that Kelley was drafted early on Day 3, while Jackson—a former seventh-round pick—is now entering his third season with just 406 career rushing yards.

 

WR Keenan Allen: Will we see Allen finish as a top-eight receiver again after a 104/1,199/6 line in 2019? Perhaps not, but the drop has likely gone too far with many ranking him in the WR24-WR30 range. Whether it’s Taylor or Herbert under center, Allen should continue be the primary target for what could be a simplified passing attack, and it sounds like he has a chip on his shoulder for a variety of reasons this year.

 

WR Mike Williams: Williams is a somewhat difficult player to rank because while the talent is high, the Chargers will have a more conservative offense that needs to get to ball to Austin Ekeler, Keenan Allen, and Hunter Henry, too. That said, Tyrod Taylor was able to pull a 1,000-yard season out of Sammy Watkins in Buffalo, so you shouldn’t be worried about the quarterback being hesitant about throwing outside the numbers; in fact, Taylor has one of the game’s best deep balls, which could help Williams reach WR2 status if they hit on enough big plays.

 

WR Joe Reed: The No. 3 receiver spot hasn’t really been fantasy relevant for the Chargers in recent years, and that might not change in 2020. In the future, though, Reed could become an offensive factor with good explosiveness and size at six-foot-one, and he notably played very well against top competition at Virginia.

 

WR K.J. Hill: The all-time leader in receptions at Ohio State, Hill lasted until the seventh round in April’s draft, but that might have had a lot to do with the strength of the position. Hill can eventually settle in as a solid No. 2 or No. 3 wideout that would have decent value in PPR leagues, but for now he’s just a dynasty prospect on a top-heavy offense.

 

WRs Jason Moore and Darius Jennings: Moore has a shot to be on the radar if Los Angeles goes with a veteran for the No. 3 receiver job, but it would be as nothing more than a weekly flier. As for Jennings, he will mainly contribute in the return game, though he could be pushed by Joe Reed.

 

TE Hunter Henry: Similar to Mike Williams, Henry is a tough player to rank because the talent is there (including as a red zone threat), but targets/consistency could be a concern on a defensive team. They are all close, but fantasy owners might want to lean towards the higher floor of Tyler Higbee or Evan Engram in the same tier at tight end.

 

TE Virgil Green: As has been the case throughout his career, Green will mostly be relied on as a blocker behind Henry. Last year, the veteran caught just nine passes in 15 games, and he’s never had more than one score in a season through nine years.

 

TE Donald Parham: He won’t start the season on the redraft radar, but Parham is a name to file away due to the durability concerns of Hunter Henry. At a towering six-foot-eight, Parham was one of the best players in the XFL earlier this year, and his size could be tough to defend in scoring territory.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB Joshua Kelley (FantasyPros ADP: RB70)

Unfortunately, the value of Kelley is almost certainly going to rise after he’s on Hard Knocks starting next week, as his positive attitude has a good chance of being featured. Still, not actually being on the field for preseason action will have Kelley much further down the rankings than he should be, and RB70 is stealing.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Mike Williams

Williams is still just 25 years old, but since a lost rookie campaign, he’s separately had an 11-touchdown season (in 2018) and a 1,000-yard season (in 2019) despite just 179 total targets in his career. The former No. 7 overall pick is one of two players to average at least 10.0 yards per target in each of the past two seasons.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Las Vegas Raiders

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Las Vegas Raiders

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Derek Carr: The early-season schedule will be key for Carr in 2020 (the Raiders are set to face New Orleans, New England, Buffalo, Kansas City, and Tampa Bay from Week 2 through the end of October), but all the pieces are there for him to succeed. The addition of Henry Ruggs III in particular should open up the entire offense, so Carr projects to be an underrated QB2 for as long as he’s the starter.

 

QB Marcus Mariota: If Las Vegas ends up struggling early, then Mariota could be this year’s version of Ryan Tannehill—and the fantasy upside would be just as high. Compared to a bigger Russell Wilson by Jon Gruden when he entered the league in 2015, Mariota was paid lofty money for a backup job with the Raiders, and his dual-threat skillset could potentially provide a spark. It’s worth noting that Gruden wanted Carr to run more in 2019.

 

RB Josh Jacobs: The RB9-RB12 range is very close in our rankings, and Jacobs could be on either end of it. On one hand, Las Vegas added three notable running backs this offseason, and Jacobs notably dropped three passes on 27 targets as a rookie. On the other hand, he has 100-yard, multi-score upside every week and will be running behind one of the NFL’s best offensive lines. It will be interesting to see how many backs make the roster out of camp.

 

RB Jalen Richard: The Raiders signed Richard to a two-year extension earlier this year, and he should remain the favorite for receiving work if/when Jacobs is spelled in obvious passing situations. That said, Lynn Bowden Jr. was drafted as a running back, and Richard caught just 36 passes last year after 68 receptions the previous season. He will be just a PPR FLEX in deeper leagues.

 

RB Lynn Bowden Jr.: At least to start his career, Bowden Jr.—who played receiver, running back, and quarterback at Kentucky—will probably be a do-it-all player that helps from a real-life perspective more than a fantasy perspective. In the future, he could earn the No. 2 role in tandem with Josh Jacobs; consider him a dynasty investment for now.

 

RBs Devontae Booker and Jeremy Hill: It would be a surprise if the Raiders kept five running backs on the roster, so Booker and the recently-signed Hill will probably be battling for one spot (and even keeping four backs isn’t a lock). Booker signed in the spring, but he might actually have a tougher time making the roster as more of a pass-catcher, while Hill can be insurance for Jacobs as a power back. Neither is currently worth drafting this summer.

 

WR Henry Ruggs III: Rookie wideouts could face a tough transition due to COVID-19, but Ruggs III’s speed won’t take any time to translate—and Jon Gruden isn’t going to waste much time getting the ball into his hands on offense. Despite being perhaps the fastest player in football, Ruggs III will also bring toughness and reliable hands. The No. 12 overall pick will begin his career as an upside FLEX.

 

WR Hunter Renfrow: NFL Network analyst David Carr said last month that Renfrow could lead the league in touchdown receptions, and while that might be a stretch, his pace of 80/1,120/9 over his final seven games last season could point to big things in 2020. Fantasy owners will need to hope Renfrow barely leaves the field on an offense that added plenty of weapons this offseason.

 

WR Tyrell Williams: The expectation is that Williams will remain a starter this season as the “X” receiver in Gruden’s offense (Ruggs III will be the “Z”), so he could be getting overlooked as a late-round flier. Last year, the veteran caught a touchdown in each of his first five games, but a foot injury derailed his season as he played at less than 100% over the final two months.

 

WR Nelson Agholor: Agholor has the talent to earn a role for Las Vegas, and it wouldn’t be a surprise to see him push Tyrell Williams for playing time. Both Derek Carr and Marcus Mariota throw very catchable balls, which should help Agholor play to the level he did with Nick Foles under center in Philadelphia.

 

WR Bryan Edwards: Edwards didn’t get a ton of pre-draft buzz in a loaded receiver class, but he possesses a great combination of physicality and smoothness at six-foot-three, 212 pounds. Again, the transition rookie wideouts are facing could make redraft value difficult to achieve, so Edwards is more of a dynasty stash that could start as soon as 2021.

 

TE Darren Waller: In his first season as a full-time player, Waller went for a 90/1,145/3 line and finished as the overall TE4 in 0.5 PPR leagues. There is some concern about all the new weapons taking some targets away from Waller, but after just three touchdowns last year, we could see Gruden wanting to make him more of a focus in scoring territory this season. He is worth considering in the first five rounds in all formats.

 

TE Jason Witten: Las Vegas isn’t going to take Waller off the field in favor of Witten, but the future Hall of Fame tight end should play on an offense that will use a variety of heavy personnel groupings—making him a touchdown-dependent streamer in his age-38 campaign.

 

TE Foster Moreau: Moreau scored five times on 25 targets as a rookie, but he isn’t a lock to be ready for Week 1 after suffering a knee injury in December, and he projects to be the team’s No. 3 tight end behind Waller and Witten. The LSU product would likely need an injury to have significant redraft value this year.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Henry Ruggs III (FantasyPros ADP: WR52)

You would think a player with the pure speed of Ruggs III would be getting drafted higher based on the ceiling alone, but his ADP and ranking (WR56) are both surprisingly modest right now. No preseason action for casual fans (and analysts for that matter) could lead to the “hype trains” not really gaining steam as we near the regular season.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Bryan Edwards

Jon Gruden was extremely excited about Edwards as a prospect, and for good reason, as he looked like one of the best players on the field every week against SEC competition. With both Henry Ruggs III and Darren Waller stretching the field, Edwards should see plenty of favorable coverage when he eventually works his way to the starting lineup.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 3.0 (10-team, Full PPR)

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 3.0 (10-team, Full PPR)

This week’s fantasy football mock draft using the FantasyPros draft simulator is for a 10-team, full PPR league.

 

Mock 1.0: 12-team, 0.5 PPR

Mock 2.0: 14-team Superflex, 0.5 PPR

 

Round 1

1.01: Christian McCaffrey, CAR RB
1.02: Saquon Barkley, NYG RB
1.03: Michael Thomas, NO WR
1.04: Davante Adams, GB WR
1.05: Ezekiel Elliott, DAL RB
1.06: Alvin Kamara, NO RB
1.07: Dalvin Cook, MIN RB
1.08: Joe Mixon, CIN RB
1.09: Derrick Henry, TEN RB
1.10: Julio Jones, ATL WR

 

Thoughts: Mixon is the feature back on an offense that will almost certainly improve with Joe Burrow at quarterback, and he has the skillset to catch 50+ passes if given more opportunities.

 

Round 2

2.01: Austin Ekeler, LAC RB
2.02: DeAndre Hopkins, ARI WR
2.03: Clyde Edwards-Helaire, KC RB
2.04: Miles Sanders, PHI RB
2.05: Tyreek Hill, KC WR
2.06: Patrick Mahomes, KC QB
2.07: Chris Godwin, TB WR
2.08: Kenyan Drake, ARI RB
2.09: Mike Evans, TB WR
2.10: Josh Jacobs, LV RB

 

Thoughts: I was between Edwards-Helaire and Miles Sanders, but the edge went to Kansas City’s new feature back, who should be a dual-threat star in Andy Reid’s offense from Day 1.

 

Round 3

3.01: Travis Kelce, KC TE
3.02: George Kittle, SF TE
3.03: Allen Robinson, CHI WR
3.04: Adam Thielen, MIN WR
3.05: Aaron Jones, GB RB
3.06: Nick Chubb, CLE RB
3.07: Lamar Jackson, BAL QB
3.08: JuJu Smith-Schuster, PIT WR
3.09: Kenny Golladay, DET WR
3.10: D.J. Moore, CAR WR

 

Thoughts: There are several wideouts on the board that I feel comfortable with, but I decided to take Smith-Schuster, as he had 111 receptions in his last full season with Ben Roethlisberger under center.

 

Round 4

4.01: Chris Carson, SEA RB
4.02: Odell Beckham Jr., CLE WR
4.03: Cooper Kupp, LAR WR
4.04: Mark Andrews, BAL TE
4.05: Zach Ertz, PHI TE
4.06: Amari Cooper, DAL WR
4.07: James Conner, PIT RB
4.08: Leonard Fournette, JAX RB
4.09: Keenan Allen, LAC WR
4.10: Calvin Ridley, ATL WR

 

Thoughts: Kupp feels like a great fit with JuJu at receiver, and I really like how this roster is starting out in a PPR league because of the combination of floor and upside at both key positions.

 

Round 5

5.01: A.J. Brown, TEN WR
5.02: Todd Gurley, ATL RB
5.03: Robert Woods, LAR WR
5.04: Melvin Gordon, DEN RB
5.05: Courtland Sutton, DEN WR
5.06: Tyler Lockett, SEA WR
5.07: D.K. Metcalf, SEA WR
5.08: Le’Veon Bell, NYJ RB
5.09: David Johnson, ARI RB
5.10: T.Y. Hilton, IND WR

 

Thoughts: Bell being on the board is a bit of a surprise, and he will hopefully be motivated after a rocky start in New York; the only concern is Frank Gore stealing too many touches.

 

Round 6

6.01: Dak Prescott, DAL QB
6.02: Darren Waller, LV TE
6.03: Russell Wilson, SEA QB
6.04: D.J. Chark, JAX WR
6.05: Terry McLaurin, WAS WR
6.06: Jarvis Landry, CLE WR
6.07: Kyler Murray, ARI QB
6.08: Evan Engram, NYG TE
6.09: Tyler Boyd, CIN WR
6.10: Stefon Diggs, BUF WR

 

Thoughts: The projected volume for my three running backs and weekly floors at receiver should have the lineup set (barring injury), so I thought Wilson was a quarterback worth targeting somewhat early with the hopes that Seattle opens up the passing attack a bit.

 

Round 7

7.01: Deshaun Watson, HOU QB
7.02: Josh Allen, BUF QB
7.03: Matt Ryan, ATL QB
7.04: DeVante Parker, MIA WR
7.05: A.J. Green, CIN WR
7.06: Drew Brees, NO QB
7.07: Marquise Brown, BAL WR
7.08: Devin Singletary, BUF RB
7.09: Aaron Rodgers, GB QB
7.10: Michael Gallup, DAL WR

 

Thoughts: The additions at receiver might hurt his receiving role, but you could also make the case that Singletary should find more space to operate underneath as a check down target for Josh Allen; he’s an excellent fourth running back in PPR leagues.

 

Round 8

8.01: Julian Edelman, NE WR
8.02: Jonathan Taylor, IND RB
8.03: Will Fuller, HOU WR
8.04: David Montgomery, CHI RB
8.05: Mark Ingram, BAL RB
8.06: Marvin Jones, DET WR
8.07: Darius Slayton, NYG WR
8.08: Kareem Hunt, CLE RB
8.09: Raheem Mostert, SF RB
8.10: Cam Akers, LAR RB

 

Thoughts: Although Fuller might not have the highest floor in PPR leagues—especially when you factor in injuries—he is a high-upside WR3 in all formats and notably has chemistry with Deshaun Watson entering a pandemic-impacted season.

 

Round 9

9.01: Brandin Cooks, HOU WR
9.02: Ronald Jones II, TB WR
9.03: James White, NE RB
9.04: John Brown, BUF WR
9.05: Deebo Samuel, SF WR
9.06: Diontae Johnson, PIT WR
9.07: Justin Jefferson, MIN WR
9.08: Tyler Higbee, LAR TE
9.09: D’Andre Swift, DET RB
9.10: Jamison Crowder, NYJ WR

 

Thoughts: Higbee was almost the pick last round, so I’ll certainly take him here; in the final five games last season, the 27-year-old caught 43 passes, including at least seven in every game.

 

Round 10

10.01: Tarik Cohen, CHI RB
10.02: Christian Kirk, ARI WR
10.03: Sterling Shepard, NYG WR
10.04: Jordan Howard, MIA RB
10.05: Derrius Guice, WAS RB
10.06: Henry Ruggs III, LV WR
10.07: Mike Williams, LAC WR
10.08: Anthony Miller, CHI WR
10.09: Emmanuel Sanders, NO WR
10.10: J.K. Dobbins, BAL RB

 

Thoughts: Shepard feels like one of the best values in the double-digit rounds of every draft, as he averaged 8.3 targets per game in ten appearances last season.

 

Round 11

11.01: CeeDee Lamb, DAL WR
11.02: Matt Breida, SF RB
11.03: Sony Michel, NE RB
11.04: Robby Anderson, CAR WR
11.05: Ke’Shawn Vaughn, TB RB
11.06: Phillip Lindsay, DEN RB
11.07: 49ers, SF D/ST
11.08: Latavius Murray, NO RB
11.09: Kerryon Johnson, DET RB
11.10: Golden Tate, NYG WR

 

Thoughts: Remember, you don’t necessarily need to handcuff your own guys, and I’ll take Murray’s monster upside on the bench if something were to happen to Alvin Kamara.

 

Round 12

12.01: Preston Williams, MIA WR
12.02: Hunter Henry, LAC TE
12.03: Carson Wentz, PHI QB
12.04: Jerry Jeudy, DEN WR
12.05: Steelers, PIT D/ST
12.06: Rob Gronkowski, NE TE
12.07: Jared Cook, NO TE
12.08: T.J. Hockenson, DET TE
12.09: Tom Brady, TB QB
12.10: Matthew Stafford, DET QB

 

Thoughts: I am set at quarterback with Russell Wilson, but Wentz has been sitting there and has top-five upside for a Philly offense that should have continuity despite some new weapons.

 

Round 13

13.01: Marlon Mack, IND RB
13.02: N’Keal Harry, NE WR
13.03: Daniel Jones, NYG WR
13.04: Tevin Coleman, SF RB
13.05: Bills, BUF D/ST
13.06: Mecole Hardman, KC WR
13.07: Alexander Mattison, MIN WR
13.08: Jalen Reagor, PHI WR
13.09: Ryan Tannehill, TEN QB
13.10: Hayden Hurst, ATL TE

 

Thoughts: This could end up being a wasted pick because of the learning curve rookies will face, but I might as well pair Wentz with the big-play threat in Reagor as an upside stack off the bench.

 

Round 14

14.01: Darrell Henderson, LAR RB
14.02: Alshon Jeffery, PHI WR
14.03: Zack Moss, BUF RB
14.04: Michael Pittman Jr., IND WR
14.05: Ben Roethlisberger, PIT QB
14.06: Nyheim Hines, IND RB
14.07: Chase Edmonds, ARI RB
14.08: Duke Johnson, HOU RB
14.09: Boston Scott, PHI RB
14.10: Ravens, BAL D/ST

 

Thoughts: Moss is both a handcuff for Devin Singletary and a guy that could potentially have standalone value if he sees enough early-down and short-yardage work on an ascending offense.

 

Round 15

15.01: Sammy Watkins, KC WR
15.02: Patriots, NE D/ST
15.03: Bears, CHI D/ST
15.04: Vikings, MIN D/ST
15.05: Tony Pollard, DAL RB
15.06: Noah Fant, DEN TE
15.07: Austin Hooper, CLE TE
15.08: Rams, LAR D/ST
15.09: Justin Rohrwasser, NE K
15.10: Harrison Butker, KC K

 

Round 16

16.01: Saints, NO D/ST
16.02: Falcons, ATL D/ST
16.03: Justin Tucker, BAL K
16.04: Wil Lutz, NO K
16.05: Greg Zuerlein, LAR K
16.06: Matt Prater, DET K
16.07: Robbie Gould, SF K
16.08: Matt Gay, TB K
16.09: Zane Gonzalez, ARI K
16.10: Younghoe Koo, ATL K

 

Final Roster

QB: Russell Wilson, SEA
RB: Joe Mixon, CIN
RB: Clyde Edwards-Helaire, KC
WR: JuJu Smith-Schuster, PIT
WR: Cooper Kupp, LAR
TE: Tyler Higbee, LAR
FLEX: Le’Veon Bell, NYJ RB
D/ST: Rams, LAR
K: Justin Tucker, BAL
BE: Devin Singletary, BUF RB
BE: Will Fuller: HOU WR
BE: Sterling Shepard, NYG WR
BE: Latavius Murray, NO RB
BE: Carson Wentz, PHI QB
BE: Jalen Reagor, PHI WR
BE: Zack Moss, BUF RB

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Kansas City Chiefs

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Kansas City Chiefs

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Patrick Mahomes: The same supporting cast will essentially return for Mahomes this season (with Clyde Edwards-Helaire replacing Damien Williams), and he will have 50-touchdown upside as a high-end QB1 in Andy Reid’s offense. Already having a ring and getting paid might make Kansas City have even more of a fun, playground attack in which Mahomes puts up crazy numbers, so he’s certainly worth considering in the first three rounds in normal formats and a top-five pick in superflex leagues.

 

RB Clyde Edwards-Helaire: The opt out for Damien Williams came at the perfect time to write the Chiefs preview, as Edwards-Helaire will now be a clear feature back and possesses high-end RB1 upside. The pass-catching ability is what really excites Kansas City about CEH, but he is also a physical runner with superb contact balance at five-foot-seven. Get Fantasy Consigliere to see exactly where we have the rookie ranked in redraft leagues.

 

RB Darrel Williams: The pecking order behind CEH is unclear, but Williams may have an edge—at least to start out the season—because of his ability in pass protection. Last season, the 25-year-old actually handled most of the third down work ahead of Damien Williams, and Edwards-Helaire might not be fully trusted to protect the $500-million quarterback early in his career. Simply seeing the field could lead to weekly value because of how explosive the offense is.

 

RB DeAndre Washington: Patrick Mahomes doesn’t seem like a guy that wants a significant say in playing time for the rest of the offense, but the connection with Washington—his former college teammate—is certainly worth noting. Remember, the Chiefs have seen Washington eight games over the past four years in AFC West matchups, and they thought highly enough of him to offer a contract in the offseason.

 

RB Darwin Thompson: Thompson was a popular late-round flier last season, but the hype turned out to be out of control, as he saw just 46 touches and spent most of the year as the team’s No. 4 back. While we wouldn’t expect things to be much different in 2020, Thompson would have definite fantasy value if he can hop either Williams or Washington on the depth chart.

 

WR Tyreek Hill: There is probably a five-way race for the WR1 spot this year, and if you want maximum upside, it’s tough to make a case over Hill. Even when he’s having a quiet week, Hill is perhaps the most frightening opponent in the league from a fantasy perspective because one touch could completely change a matchup. Consider him an excellent target at the Round 1/Round 2 turn.

 

WR Sammy Watkins: Being a former top-five pick has made people (unfairly) negative towards Watkins throughout his career, but that should end after he proved himself in Kansas City’s Super Bowl run with 90+ yards in all three playoff games. The fact that the Chiefs kept him when they could have easily moved on bodes well for Watkins’ fantasy outlook; he’s a great value in the double-digit rounds.

 

WR Mecole Hardman: The efficiency numbers for Hardman were ridiculous last year—13.1 yards per target, 20.7 yards per reception, and six touchdowns on 26 receptions—so the only thing holding him back from becoming a fantasy star is a lack of targets. If Hill or Watkins ever misses time (which has a higher chance of happening due to COVID-19), Hardman would be a must-start in all formats.

 

WR Demarcus Robinson: Last season, Robinson roasted the Raiders in Week 2 with a 6/172/2 line on six targets, but he was mostly quietly the rest of the year and is highly unlikely to be ahead of Hardman on the depth chart in 2020. There should be better end-of-bench options in standard-sized leagues.

 

TE Travis Kelce: Looking to extend his record streak of 1,000-yard seasons for a tight end to five, Kelce is very close with George Kittle for the TE1 spot, and he should again dominate the middle of the field with Tyreek Hill and others stretching coverage vertically. He turns 31 in October, but Kelce is worth selecting in the second round as a top-20 pick.

 

TE Ricky Seals-Jones: The second tight end in Andy Reid’s offense is worth monitoring because it could lead to a touchdown in any given week, and Seals-Jones has the athleticism to be a solid contributor in scoring territory. For now, he should be on the waiver wire, but RSJ could draw streaming consideration when injuries inevitably hit.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Sammy Watkins (FantasyPros ADP: WR50)

The best value in redraft leagues would have easily been Damien Williams if he didn’t opt out, but Watkins is still a possible bargain—especially with the consensus rankings having him ten spots lower. Again, we could see the entire offense play more freely with a championship already accomplished, and Watkins still has an untapped ceiling for a 16-game slate.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Mecole Hardman

Hardman is arguably the fastest player in the league, and it’s only a matter of time before he becomes close to a full-time player to give the Chiefs an absolute bomb squad. With Tyreek Hill on one side of the field and Travis Kelce working the middle, good luck containing Hardman for 60 minutes.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Jacksonville Jaguars

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Jacksonville Jaguars

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Gardner Minshew: A sixth-round pick last year, Minshew was extremely impressive in 14 games (12 starts), throwing for 3,271 yards with a 21:6 touchdown-interception ratio. Now, he is the unquestioned starter on a team that is expected to trail a ton, but could Minshew could be a candidate for a sophomore slump? The Jacksonville offensive line isn’t great, and defenses will have had a long offseason to break down his game; we’ll see if Jay Gruden’s offense can help Minshew build on last year’s QB19 finish.

 

RB Leonard Fournette: It feels like 2020 could be a lost campaign for Fournette if things go off the rails for Jacksonville as a team, so there is definite risk in him as a selection in the first three rounds of drafts this summer. Optimistically, you can hope the touchdown total will increase after just three scores last year, but the receptions will almost certainly decline (76 catches last year after just 74 total targets over his first two seasons), and it’s worth noting that Fournette will face the Ravens and Bears in December when many are playing for a fantasy title.

 

RB Chris Thompson: Thompson was a favorite of Jay Gruden in Washington, and he should have a quality role as the pass-catching back on a team that will likely need to score points. Consider him a PPR FLEX option that can push for a career-high in receptions with Minshew under center.

 

RB Ryquell Armstead: A power back at 220 pounds, Armstead runs with toughness and physicality—which is something that can help set the tone for a rebuilding franchise if he gets a shot this fall. With Fournette healthy and active, the Jags might decide to get the most out of their former No. 4 overall pick before he leaves, but Armstead is a great handcuff that could see a significant role for multiple reasons in 2020.

 

RB Devin Ozigbo: Ozigbo is another second-year runner that could see more time this season, and he is similar to Armstead as a grinder at 225 pounds. That said, we like Armstead’s versatility a little more (he played some defense at Temple), so Ozigbo will only be a flier in very deep leagues if Jacksonville keeps four backs.

 

WR D.J. Chark: Chark is in a crowded group of WR2 options, but there is a lot to feel good about for him in the middle rounds. For one, he will be catching passes from the same quarterback as last year (and on a team that will have to throw). Also, Chark will apparently see more time in the slot, which should only help raise his floor in difficult matchups. A WR1 finish is certainly possible for the six-foot-four deep threat.

 

WR Dede Westbrook: The selection of Laviska Shenault Jr. would seem to threaten Westbrook’s role in 2020 and beyond, but the COVID-impacted season should slant things in his favor come September. Westbrook has caught 66 passes in back-to-back seasons, and he has room to add more big-play potential based on his Oklahoma career a few years ago (19.1 yards per reception in his final season, compared to 10.8 yards per reception through three NFL seasons).

 

WR Laviska Shenault Jr.: The Jaguars likely have a Deebo Samuel-like role in mind for Shenault Jr., so we could see him used on short passes to get the ball in his hands while he develops as a receiver. Like we saw with some of the rookie wideouts in 2019, though, Shenault Jr. might make a bigger impact in the second half; it’s probably best to keep him on the waiver wire in standard-sized formats.

 

WR Chris Conley: Conley quietly went for a 47/775/5 line in his first season with the Jaguars, and he could have a case to remain a starter in three-wide sets—which led to playing 79% of the team’s offensive snaps in 2019. Remember, Conley is still in his athletic prime and runs a 4.35 (with a 45-inch vertical) at six–foot-three.

 

WR Keelan Cole: Seven games from the end of his rookie campaign through the start of the 2018 season had Cole on track to be a star (75/1,474/9 pace with 19.6 yards per reception), but he’s caught just 52 passes in 30 games since then, and now he will be the No. 5 wideout for Jacksonville. It would probably take an injury or two for Cole to become a significant contributor.

 

WR Collin Johnson: The Jaguars have a couple of big-bodied wideouts already on the roster, but Johnson projects to be a potential downfield and red zone threat at six-foot-six with plus functional athleticism for his size. The rookie could have easily gone higher than the fifth round in a draft class that wasn’t quite as loaded at receiver; he’ll start his career as a dynasty stash.

 

TE Tyler Eifert: Eifert was finally able to stay healthy for all 16 games last year in Cincinnati, and he could immediately slide in as Gardner Minshew’s security blanket this season. However, the veteran will turn 30 before the opener and averaged career-lows in yards per reception (10.1) and yards per target (6.9) last season. You’ll probably need a score for him to be worth starting as a streamer.

 

TE Josh Oliver: There was optimism about Oliver potentially becoming an immediate starter as a third-round rookie catching passes from Nick Foles, but he had just three receptions in four games after starting the season with a hamstring injury and ending it with a broken back. While Oliver won’t be a recommended selection in redraft leagues, he could get a late-season boost if the Jags go into evaluation mode.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Chris Conley (FantasyPros ADP: WR89)

D.J. Chark (ADP of WR24) looks like the best value for Jacksonville if you want a guy more firmly on the radar, but Conley is a player not currently being drafted that could earn weekly FLEX consideration. For what it’s worth, the former Georgia standout is one of 25 receivers to have at least five touchdowns in each of the past two seasons.

 

Best dynasty investment: RB Ryquell Armstead

Jacksonville spent an early Day 3 pick on Armstead in the 2019 NFL Draft, and he could get a shot to prove himself as the future starter with Fournette possibly having one foot out the door entering the final year of his deal. And although there’s been no indication one might be on the horizon, a trade of Fournette would shoot Armstead up the rankings in both redraft and dynasty leagues.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Indianapolis Colts

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Indianapolis Colts

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Philip Rivers: Tossing 20 interceptions obviously hurt him from a fantasy perspective, but Rivers threw for 4,615 yards last season, and unlike most quarterbacks on a new team, he will benefit from knowing Frank Reich’s offense. While the Colts might not have the top-end star power of Los Angeles, the overall skill-position talent is strong from top to bottom; we could see Rivers have a bounce-back season as a value QB2.

 

RB Jonathan Taylor: The downside for Taylor is that he will open his career in a three-man committee and comes into the league with concerns about ball security (18 career fumbles at Wisconsin). However, he is a former track star with 4.39 speed at 226 pounds, and the Colts have perhaps the best offensive line in football. If you can show some patience, Taylor is worth investing in early.

 

RB Marlon Mack: A shortened offseason should make Mack the favorite to start in Week 1, but how will his workload be impacted? The team has said they want a role for Nyheim Hines as a pass-catcher, and the aforementioned Taylor was drafted to turn ten-yard gains into 40-yard gains—turning Mack from a high-floor RB2 into a volatile FLEX. Still, there is value in the middle rounds (especially early in the season).

 

RB Nyheim Hines: Even after Indy spent a second-round pick on Jonathan Taylor, the willingness of Philip Rivers to dump it off underneath can provide a boost to Hines, who is an underrated athlete with 4.39 speed. If the receiving back can reach our projection of 60+ receptions, he will be firmly in play as a PPR flex.

 

WR T.Y. Hilton: Injuries and not having Andrew Luck were obviously factors, but Hilton averaged just 11.1 yards per reception last season, and there is some definite concern about a permanent decline entering his age-30/31 campaign. That said, Philip Rivers won’t be afraid to take shots when they’re there, and Hilton should see more favorable coverage if the running game improves.

 

WR Parris Campbell: Campbell’s rookie season was derailed by various injuries (abdomen, hand, foot), but expectations were extremely high, so he has the potential to be a difference-maker if healthy. The former Ohio State standout will get three soft matchups in September (@ JAX, v MIN, v NYJ) that should be telling for his rest-of-season outlook.

 

WR Michael Pittman Jr.: Remember, the Colts drafted Pittman Jr. ahead of even Jonathan Taylor—which is evidence of the high hopes they have for him. For this year, though, the rookie projects to be a volatile weapon on the outside, and all the weapons in Frank Reich’s offense will make it difficult to trust him in redraft leagues.

 

WR Zach Pascal: The young second-rounders (Campbell and Pittman Jr.) are the projected starters behind T.Y. Hilton, but don’t sleep on Pascal earning a role after he impressed with a 41/607/5 line in 2019. Still just 25, Pascal averaged 14.8 yards per reception last year and knows the offense.

 

WR Dezmon Patmon: Patmon will start his career as a dynasty prospect, and he has the profile of a player that could eventually work his way into an offensive role and/or starting job. At Washington State, the six-foot-four receiver showed impressive smoothness for a bigger receiver.

 

TE Jack Doyle: He might not have the athleticism or upside of other tight ends being drafted in TE2 range, but Doyle has been productive for the Colts—including an 80-reception season back in 2017. It will be interesting to see how much an improved offensive line changes things for Rivers, as Doyle will be a prototypical security blanket on short/intermediate routes.

 

TE Trey Burton: Although it doesn’t feel like it, Burton actually appeared in half of Chicago’s games last season—but he was limited to 84 scoreless yards on 24 targets. If he’s finally healthy, the veteran can be a solid 1B for an offense that has leaned on multiple tight ends in the past; we just wouldn’t bank on him having the same kind of upside that Eric Ebron had alongside Jack Doyle.

 

TE Mo Alie-Cox: Alie-Cox might have the best skillset to be utilized in the red zone as a former basketball player with plus size (six-foot-five, 267 pounds), so fantasy owners should at least keep tabs on him as a possible streamer. Through two years, Alie-Cox has averaged 9.4 yards per target and scored twice on 24 targets.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB Jonathan Taylor (FantasyPros ADP: RB24)

We could see a slow start from Taylor due to COVID-19 impacting first-year players, but running backs can transition quickly to the league, and he certainly has the talent to turn into an immediate star. It might be wise to pair him with a runner that’s projected to have an early-season role (perhaps Marlon Mack, or someone like Damien Williams) and then hoping Taylor is eventually unleashed.

 

Best dynasty investment: RB Jonathan Taylor

The pre-draft evaluations by most in the media and his fall to the second round say otherwise, but we think Taylor is an elite prospect, and now is the time to invest before he shows it on an NFL field. Remember, some of the league’s top backs (Nick Chubb, Derrick Henry, Joe Mixon, Dalvin Cook, etc.) were drafted in the second round.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Houston Texans

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Houston Texans

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Deshaun Watson: Training camp being shortened by COVID-19 could really impact Watson and the new-look Houston passing attack this season, as they will have very limited practice time to all get on the same page. That said, Watson’s dual-threat skillset will always put an overall QB1 finish in his range of outcomes, so he’s worth considering as early as the fifth or sixth round this summer. Perhaps the evolved supporting cast can lead to even better passing numbers in a spread-it-out offense.

 

RB David Johnson: The value of Johnson depends on how much you believe he has left in the tank, but fantasy owners should remember that he was the RB6 through six games last season before getting injured, and Bill O’Brien didn’t trade DeAndre Hopkins away for a guy that won’t be the feature back. Plus, we expect Johnson to be used as a key receiving option underneath on an offense that has plenty of field-stretchers.

 

RB Duke Johnson: Fantasy owners want Johnson to get a bigger workload every year, and that fruitless trend is likely to continue if David Johnson stays healthy. All the acquisitions made could leave Duke as low as the fifth or sixth option in the passing game, so he’s not a player that should be heavily invested in as a standalone option in redraft leagues.

 

WR Brandin Cooks: The entire Houston receiving corps seems to be undervalued based on the upside for everyone, and Cooks in particular should provide upside in the middle rounds. Aside from being a talented and versatile wideout, the belief that Cooks—who is still just 26—has a durability issue might be a little overblown (he’s only missed two regular season games over the past five years). And the lack of practice time could hurt his connection with Watson, but it’s worth noting Cooks went for lines of 65/1,082/7 and 80/1,204/5 in his first season with the Patriots (2017) and Rams (2018).

 

WR Will Fuller: If you could guarantee health, Fuller would be a top-20 option in 0.5 PPR leagues and nearly a lock to beat his WR35 ADP. However, you can’t guarantee health, and there might not be a player in the league banking on untapped potential more than Fuller, who has never had more than 49 receptions or 670 yards in a season since entering the league in 2016. The former Notre Dame standout is worth taking above his consensus ranking (WR36), but we’d prefer Cooks’ season-long floor.

 

WR Randall Cobb: The forgotten addition for the Texans, Cobb signed a three-year, $27-million deal in the offseason, and he should be a full-time player and weekly fantasy contributor out of the slot. Last season, Cobb put up a 55/828/3 line as the No. 3 receiver in Dallas, and his game seems to be a strong stylistic fit with Deshaun Watson. The veteran could be a hot pickup after a projected shootout against the Chiefs in Week 1.

 

WR Kenny Stills: Houston might want insurance for Will Fuller, but it feels like Stills is a player that can be traded before the regular season, and he isn’t worth drafting in 10- or 12-team redraft leagues this summer. As things currently stand, the 28-year-old would probably need to connect on a deep ball to pay dividends in a spot start.

 

WR Keke Coutee: Coutee essentially ended up in the dog house last season, so while the talent is there, he might be closer to the roster bubble than fantasy relevancy in redraft leagues. Through two seasons, the former fourth-round pick has missed 17-of-32 regular season games.

 

WR Isaiah Coulter: Bill O’Brien recently said it will be tough for young players to make an impact in 2020, and Coulter could really be facing a difficult transition coming from small school Rhode Island. He did perform well against big schools, though, and the durability issues for some of the Houston playmakers at least puts him on the radar in redraft leagues.

 

TE Darren Fells: Scoring seven touchdowns helped Fells finish as the TE13 last season, but he is a definite candidate to regress this year with the Texans having multiple young options that could see an expanded role. The size (six-foot-seven) will make Fells a touchdown threat every week, but he could be a better real-life contributor in 2020.

 

TE Jordan Akins: Akins actually led Houston tight ends in receptions (36) and receiving yards (418) last year, so we could see him take another leap in his third season as someone that has built-in chemistry with Deshaun Watson. The health of the rest of the offense will be key for Akins’ fantasy value.

 

TE Jordan Thomas: There was a point last year when the coaching staff apparently said Thomas would see an expanded role, but he caught just two passes on four targets in seven appearances (including playoffs). Right now, he’s probably stuck behind Darren Fells as a big target in scoring territory.

 

TE Kahale Warring: Based on draft capital, Warring—a third-round pick last year—is the most valuable option on the depth chart at tight end for Houston, but he spent his entire rookie campaign on injured reserve and could struggle to earn a role in 2020. Consider him a dynasty stash for now.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB David Johnson (FantasyPros ADP: RB23)

The RB2 rankings are very crowded, but Johnson is probably getting overlooked as the starter on an offense that just helped Carlos Hyde reach 1,000 rushing yards for the first time in his career. If DJ shows well in September against a challenging slate (@ KC, v BAL, @ PIT), it would obviously bode well for his rest-of-season outlook.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Isaiah Coulter

It might be wise to wait a year if you’d need to trade for Coulter in a dynasty league, but we like his skillset to be a long-time starter at the next level. In particular, Coulter seems to have a natural feel as a route runner and should be able to get open against NFL cornerbacks as he develops his game.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 2.0 (14-team Superflex, 0.5 PPR)

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 2.0 (14-team Superflex, 0.5 PPR)

This week’s fantasy football mock draft using the FantasyPros draft simulator is for a 14-team Superflex league with 0.5 PPR scoring.

 

Mock 1.0: 12-team, 0.5 PPR

 

Round 1

1.01: Christian McCaffrey, CAR RB
1.02: Lamar Jackson, BAL QB
1.03: Patrick Mahomes, KC QB
1.04: Saquon Barkley, NYG RB
1.05: Ezekiel Elliott, DAL RB
1.06: Michael Thomas, NO WR
1.07: Alvin Kamara, NO RB
1.08: Russell Wilson, SEA QB
1.09: Dak Prescott, DAL QB
1.10: Derrick Henry, TEN RB
1.11: Deshaun Watson, HOU QB
1.12: Dalvin Cook, MIN RB
1.13: Davante Adams, GB WR
1.14: Joe Mixon, CIN RB

 

Thoughts: Saquon Barkley is tough to pass up, but Jackson’s value gives him the edge for a superflex league—especially a 14-teamer—where quarterbacks will fly off the board.

 

Round 2

2.01: Tyreek Hill, KC WR
2.02: DeAndre Hopkins, HOU WR
2.03: Kyler Murray, ARI QB
2.04: Julio Jones, ATL WR
2.05: Kenyan Drake, ARI RB
2.06: Miles Sanders, PHI RB
2.07: Kenny Golladay, DET WR
2.08: Nick Chubb, CLE RB
2.09: Travis Kelce, KC TE
2.10: Josh Jacobs, LV RB
2.11: Clyde Edwards-Helaire, KC RB
2.12: Carson Wentz, PHI QB
2.13: Chris Godwin, TB WR
2.14: George Kittle, SF TE

 

Thoughts: While I was hoping George Kittle would be there for my next pick, I feel good about taking Godwin, who you could argue is the overall WR1.

 

Round 3

3.01: Aaron Jones, GB RB
3.02: Josh Allen, BUF QB
3.03: Amari Cooper, DAL WR
3.04: Drew Brees, NO QB
3.05: JuJu Smith-Schuster, PIT WR
3.06: Mike Evans, TB WR
3.07: Matt Ryan, ATL QB
3.08: Allen Robinson, CHI WR
3.09: D.J. Moore, CAR WR
3.10: Tom Brady, TB QB
3.11: Todd Gurley, ATL RB
3.12: Austin Ekeler, LAC RB
3.13: Aaron Rodgers, QB
3.14: Odell Beckham Jr., CLE WR

 

Thoughts: I didn’t feel obligated to draft another signal-caller this early, but getting the two best running quarterbacks in football gives the roster a high floor and monster weekly ceiling.

 

Round 4

4.01: Matthew Stafford, DET QB
4.02: Leonard Fournette, JAX RB
4.03: A.J. Brown, TEN WR
4.04: Calvin Ridley, ATL WR
4.05: Cam Newton, CAR QB
4.06: Daniel Jones, NYG QB
4.07: Ben Roethlisberger, PIT QB
4.08: Adam Thielen, MIN WR
4.09: Chris Carson, SEA RB
4.10: Cooper Kupp, LAR WR
4.11: Jimmy Garoppolo, SF QB
4.12: Le’Veon Bell, NYJ RB
4.13: Melvin Gordon, LAC RB
4.14: Ryan Tannehill, TEN QB

 

Thoughts: The run on quarterbacks allowed me to still get an all-around, three-down runner with Gordon on the board.

 

Round 5

5.01: Robert Woods, LAR WR
5.02: Mark Andrews, BAL TE
5.03: James Conner, PIT RB
5.04: Terry McLaurin, WAS WR
5.05: Jared Goff, LAR QB
5.06: Baker Mayfield, CLE QB
5.07: Joe Burrow, CIN QB
5.08: Jonathan Taylor, IND RB
5.09: Courtland Sutton, DEN WR
5.10: Tyler Lockett, SEA WR
5.11: David Johnson, HOU RB
5.12: Zach Ertz, PHI TE
5.13: Devin Singletary, BUF RB
5.14: Mark Ingram, BAL RB

 

Thoughts: I didn’t get George Kittle earlier, but stacking Andrews with Lamar Jackson is the ideal backup scenario; another running back was also considered.

 

Round 6

6.01: Derek Carr, LV QB
6.02: Kirk Cousins, MIN QB
6.03: Keenan Allen, LAC WR
6.04: Teddy Bridgewater, CAR QB
6.05: D.J. Chark, JAX WR
6.06: J.K. Dobbins, BAL RB
6.07: Darren Waller, LV TE
6.08: D.K. Metcalf, SEA WR
6.09: Philip Rivers, IND QB
6.10: Kareem Hunt, CLE RB
6.11: Marquise Brown, BAL WR
6.12: Stefon Diggs, BUF WR
6.13: David Montgomery, CHI RB
6.14: DeVante Parker, MIA WR

 

Thoughts: Montgomery probably has a floor of 250 touches this season, and the Bears potentially getting improved quarterback play will help him and the entire offense.

 

Round 7

7.01: Gardner Minshew, JAX QB
7.02: T.Y. Hilton, IND WR
7.03: Derrius Guice, WAS RB
7.04: Raheem Mostert, SF RB
7.05: A.J. Green, CIN WR
7.06: D’Andre Swift, DET RB
7.07: Jarvis Landry, CLE WR
7.08: Cam Akers, LAR RB
7.09: Michael Gallup, DAL WR
7.10: Damien Williams, KC RB
7.11: Julian Edelman, NE WR
7.12: Drew Lock, DEN QB
7.13: Deebo Samuel, SF WR
7.14: Tyler Boyd, CIN WR

 

Thoughts: I expected there to be a run on wideouts before my next pick, and that’s what happened, so Hilton rounds out the starting lineup.

 

Round 8

8.01: Will Fuller, HOU WR
8.02: Marlon Mack, IND RB
8.03: John Brown, BUF WR
8.04: Marvin Jones, DET WR
8.05: Christian Kirk, ARI WR
8.06: Brandin Cooks, HOU WR
8.07: 49ers, SF D/ST
8.08: James White, NE RB
8.09: Sony Michel, NE RB
8.10: Jerry Jeudy, DEN WR
8.11: CeeDee Lamb, DAL WR
8.12: Mike Williams, LAC WR
8.13: Jordan Howard, MIA RB
8.14: Darius Slayton, NYG WR

 

Thoughts: Howard should have a solid role in Miami as the early-down bruiser, and he’s scored at least seven touchdowns in all four seasons since entering the league.

 

Round 9

9.01: Ronald Jones II, TB RB
9.02: Diontae Johnson, PIT WR
9.03: Justin Jefferson, MIN WR
9.04: Jamison Crowder, NYJ WR
9.05: Kerryon Johnson, DET RB
9.06: Steelers, PIT D/ST
9.07: Evan Engram, NYG TE
9.08: Ke’Shawn Vaughn, TB RB
9.09: Mecole Hardman, KC WR
9.10: Tevin Coleman, SF RB
9.11: Sterling Shepard, NYG WR
9.12: Phillip Lindsay, DEN RB
9.13: Darrell Henderson, LAR RB
9.14: Matt Breida, MIA RB

 

Thoughts: If the Steelers pass as much as they have in the past with Ben Roethlisberger under center, Johnson should be able to build on his impressive rookie campaign and be a solid WR3 for a league this deep.

 

Round 10

10.01: Hunter Henry, LAC TE
10.02: Emmanuel Sanders, NO WR
10.03: Robby Anderson, NYJ WR
10.04: Tarik Cohen, CHI RB
10.05: Jalen Reagor, PHI WR
10.06: Anthony Miller, CHI WR
10.07: Golden Tate, NYG WR
10.08: Ravens, BAL D/ST
10.09: Sam Darnold, NYJ QB
10.10: Latavius Murray, NO RB
10.11: Tyler Higbee, LAR TE
10.12: Henry Ruggs III, LV WR
10.13: Curtis Samuel, CAR WR
10.14: Bills, BUF D/ST

 

Thoughts: Grabbing another tight end was an option with several quality options still sitting there, but Samuel is a talented player that should be playing in a better scheme for his skillset.

 

Round 11

11.01: Dwayne Haskins, WAS QB
11.02: Tua Tagovailoa, MIA QB
11.03: Preston Williams, MIA WR
11.04: Nick Foles, CHI QB
11.05: Sammy Watkins, KC WR
11.06: Alexander Mattison, MIN RB
11.07: Ryan Fitzpatrick, MIA QB
11.08: Duke Johnson, HOU RB
11.09: N’Keal Harry, NE WR
11.10: DeSean Jackson, PHI WR
11.11: Jared Cook, NO TE
11.12: Tyrod Taylor, LAC QB
11.13: Alshon Jeffery, PHI WR
11.14: Patriots, NE D/ST

 

Thoughts: The starting quarterbacks were drying up (three left at my pick), but I decided to go a little deeper and get Tua—who will hopefully start by midseason when the late bye weeks for Lamar Jackson and Josh Allen kick in.

 

Round 12

12.01: Mitchell Trubisky, CHI QB
12.02: Allen Lazard, GB WR
12.03: Tony Pollard, DAL RB
12.04: Boston Scott, PHI RB
12.05: Zack Moss, BUF RB
12.06: Austin Hooper, CLE TE
12.07: Breshad Perriman, NYJ WR
12.08: Michael Pittman Jr., IND WR
12.09: Larry Fitzgerald, ARI WR
12.10: Noah Fant, DEN TE
12.11: Chase Edmonds, ARI WR
12.12: Rob Gronkowski, TB TE
12.13: Nyheim Hines, IND RB
12.14: Brandon Aiyuk, SF WR

 

Thoughts: While better in full PPR leagues, Hines looks to have the safest role out of all the running backs left on the board, and there are a handful of tight ends that I feel are a value for the next pick.

 

Round 13

13.01: Adrian Peterson, WAS RB
13.02: Hayden Hurst, ATL TE
13.03: Bears, CHI D/ST
13.04: Hunter Renfrow, LV WR
13.05: Saints, NO D/ST
13.06: Jamaal Williams, GB RB
13.07: Justin Jackson, LAC RB
13.08: Antonio Gibson, WAS RB
13.09: Anthony McFarland Jr., PIT RB
13.10: Blake Jarwin, DAL TE
13.11: Justin Herbert, LAC QB
13.12: Dede Westbrook, JAX WR
13.13: Mike Gesicki, MIA TE
13.14: A.J. Dillon, GB RB

 

Thoughts: Hurst has plenty of upside for a high-powered Atlanta team, and this year more than ever it makes sense to get a backup tight end with COVID-19 hanging over the league.

 

Round 14

14.01: Devonta Freeman, FA RB
14.02: Rashaad Penny, SEA RB
14.03: Ryquell Armstead, JAX RB
14.04: Darrynton Evans, TEN RB
14.05: Chiefs, KC D/ST
14.06: Damien Harris, NE RB
14.07: Jarrett Stidham, NE QB
14.08: Carlos Hyde, SEA RB
14.09: Tee Higgins, CIN WR
14.10: Jameis Winston, TB QB
14.11: Giovani Bernard, CIN RB
14.12: Justice Hill, BAL RB
14.13: Malcolm Brown, LAR RB
14.14: Joshua Kelley, LAC RB

 

Thoughts: The Rams apparently going with a backfield committee gives Brown a real shot for FLEX value if he is able to take a chunk of early-down carries and the goal-line touches.

 

Round 15

15.01: Corey Davis, TEN WR
15.02: Rams, LAR D/ST
15.03: Royce Freeman, DEN RB
15.04: Broncos, DEN D/ST
15.05: Marcus Mariota, LV QB
15.06: Mason Rudolph, PIT QB
15.07: Parris Campbell, IND WR
15.08: Chris Thompson, JAX RB
15.09: Harrison Butker, KC K
15.10: Andy Dalton, CIN QB
15.11: Justin Tucker, BAL K
15.12: Justin Rohrwasser, NE K
15.13: Vikings, MIN D/ST
15.14: Jason Witten, LV TE

 

Round 16

16.01: Wil Lutz, NO K
16.02: Greg Zuerlein, DAL K
16.03: Chargers, LAC D/ST
16.04: Eagles, PHI D/ST
16.05: Robbie Gould, SF K
16.06: Jets, NYJ D/ST
16.07: Matt Gay, TB K
16.08: Matt Prater, DET K
16.09: Zane Gonzalez, ARI K
16.10: Michael Badgley, LAC K
16.11: Dan Bailey, MIN K
16.12: Younghoe Koo, ATL K
16.13: Jake Elliott, PHI K
16.14: Ka’imi Fairbairn, HOU K

 

Final Roster

QB: Lamar Jackson, BAL
RB: Melvin Gordon, LAC
RB: David Montgomery, CHI
WR: Chris Godwin, TB
WR: T.Y. Hilton, IND
TE: Mark Andrews, BAL
SFLEX: Josh Allen, BUF QB
D/ST: Rams, LAR
K: Jake Elliott, PHI
BE: Jordan Howard, MIA RB
BE: Diontae Johnson, PIT WR
BE: Curtis Samuel, CAR WR
BE: Tua Tagovailoa, MIA QB
BE: Nyheim Hines, IND RB
BE: Hayden Hurst, ATL TE
BE: Malcolm Brown, LAR RB

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Green Bay Packers

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Green Bay Packers

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Aaron Rodgers: People are probably mistaken if they believe Rodgers remains one of the NFL’s top-five signal-callers based on how he played last season, but that doesn’t mean he can’t be better in 2020, and the selection of Jordan Love could simply make him angry—in a good way. Hopefully another year in Matt LaFleur’s system will have Rodgers more comfortable, but there is some concern about the offense slanting even more towards the run.

 

QB Jordan Love: Barring injury, it would be a major shock if Love saw the field as a rookie, but his mobility would at least put him on the fantasy radar in redraft leagues if he were to play. For the future, Love has a big arm, and Green Bay apparently likes him as a quarterback that will make throws in the structure of the offense despite having playmaking ability when needed.

 

RB Aaron Jones: Last year’s overall RB2, Jones scored 19 touchdowns and totaled over 1,500 yards in 2019—showing major talent to overcome a backfield split with Jamaal Williams. That said, second-round pick A.J. Dillon will be a bigger backup to contend with (both literally and figuratively), and the short-yardage touches potentially declining for Jones would be a significantly drain on his value. The ceiling remains high, but Jones might carry more risk than you’d like from a first- or second-round pick.

 

RB A.J. Dillon: The pick of Dillon was certainly curious for a number of reasons—including the fact that Matt LaFleur seemed to not know what he had in power back Derrick Henry when he was coordinating Tennessee’s offense in 2018. Perhaps that miscalculation will lead to Dillon eventually being featured, but it won’t happen with Jones on the roster, so he’s more of a touchdown-dependent FLEX and/or strong handcuff.

 

RB Jamaal Williams: Williams often gets knocked in the fantasy community for whatever reason, but he’s a very capable running back that will do everything that’s asked of him, so a role should be there for him this season. However, his contributions are projected to benefit the Packers more than it will fantasy owners.

 

WR Davante Adams: The debate about the WR1 in drafts this summer is extremely close between three or four guys, and Adams’ combination of projected targets, weekly floor, and touchdown potential makes him a great pick in the first round of any format. Before being derailed by a toe injury in 2019, Adams had scored 35 touchdowns in his previous three seasons, and he should be funneled targets after the team did little to add pass-catchers around Aaron Rodgers in the offseason.

 

WR Allen Lazard: Lazard caught just one pass a rookie, but he saw his role increase last season—which ended with him playing 92% of the team’s offensive snaps in the NFC Championship Game. No preseason action to see how the receivers slot in behind Adams has everyone flying dark, so we’ll see if some clarity is provided next month via team reporters.

 

WR Devin Funchess: We think Funchess can win the No. 2 job out of camp, but not having a normal offseason could impact his chances of creating chemistry with Aaron Rodgers—and there’s no guarantee he will ever be able to gain his trust. For now, consider him a quality flier in deeper leagues.

 

WRs Marquez Valdes-Scantling and Equanimeous St. Brown: Green Bay easily has the biggest receiving corps in the league, so the lack of diversity could make it difficult for MVS and St. Brown to earn a situational role without an injury to one of the projected starters.

 

TE Jace Sternberger: The Packers declining to even draft a wideout in an extremely deep class leaves the door open for someone on the roster to step up into a larger receiving role, and Sternberger could be the most likely candidate. He didn’t catch a pass in his first NFL season, but the former Texas A&M standout should be a good intermediate target with the ability to run routes out of the slot.

 

TE Josiah Deguara: Some have called him more of an H-back, but Deguara can be a traditional tight end—it just won’t be a high-volume one early in his career. While he was selected in the third round, Deguara is a dynasty stash that might always be a better real-life option than fantasy option.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB A.J. Dillon (FantasyPros ADP: RB57)

Even if you believe strongly in Aaron Jones and are low on Dillon, the current ADP of RB57 seems several spots too low for a player that—at worst—will be a premium handcuff on a run-first offense. At Boston College, Dillon scored 38 touchdowns in three seasons, and he won’t be a fun runner to take down in the open field.

 

Best dynasty investment: QB Aaron Rodgers

The options actually aren’t great for Green Bay from a dynasty value perspective because of so much uncertainty, but Rodgers is at his cheapest price since becoming “Aaron Rodgers”, and there is a chance he lands in a perfect spot to have a late-30s reemergence if/when the Packers move on.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Detroit Lions

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Detroit Lions

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Matthew Stafford: On pace for 4,998 passing yards and a 38:10 touchdown-interception ratio at the season’s midway point last year, Stafford missed the final eight games with a back injury and is now hoping to pick up where he left off in a big season for the franchise. We could see Matt Patricia wanting to lean more on the running game if Detroit improves defensively, but Stafford has top-five upside based on his talent and supporting cast.

 

RB Kerryon Johnson: Injuries have impacted Johnson in both seasons to start his career, but he’s shown a true three-down skillset dating back to his time at Auburn—and notably just turned 23 last month. While Kerryon won’t be a 20- or 25-touch back if everyone stays healthy, 15 or so touches per game (and the short-yardage role) would give him a shot at RB2 status behind an offensive line that should be improved.

 

RB D’Andre Swift: The Lions drafted Swift with the No. 35 overall pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, but does that automatically mean he will be given the lead role? Especially because of COVID-19’s impact, the franchise—based on their New England roots—might be more comfortable with the experience of Johnson, including as a pass protector. Plus, Swift has a better change-of-pace skillset to provide a spark on just eight-to-12 touches, so he may settle in as a FLEX to start his career.

 

RB Bo Scarbrough: The thing that could hurt the case for Kerryon Johnson as a mid-round value would be Scarbrough staying involved, but we believe the all-around talent of both he and Swift should make it a two-headed backfield. If Scarbrough does have a role, though, he’d probably be just a touchdown-dependent FLEX.

 

WR Kenny Golladay: It didn’t matter much who was under center for the Lions in 2019 when it came to Golladay’s numbers (he had a 60/1,100/8 pace in eight games without Stafford), and he should again be primed for a standout campaign this fall. You could make a strong case for him ranking as high as the WR6, which is where he finished last year.

 

WR Marvin Jones: Some are hyping Jones up as a steal compared to Golladay, but last year’s numbers—even with Stafford under center—were very volatile from week-to-week. Although the veteran has multi-score upside every time he hits the field, he might be best drafted in the WR35-WR40 range coming off back-to-back season-ending trips to IR entering his age-30 season.

 

WR Danny Amendola: Amendola has caught 59 passes on three different teams over the past three years, but he’s totaled just four touchdowns and 42.5 yards per game over that span—making him a low-upside FLEX in PPR leagues. D’Andre Swift having a sizeable role in the passing game and T.J. Hockenson potentially breaking out are definite concerns.

 

WR Geronimo Allison: Allison flashed as a route runner with good size in four years with the Packers, but he’ll just be a depth piece with Detroit. The 26-year-old had just 287 yards in 16 games last year after an impressive start in 2018 (19/289/2 in four games) was derailed due to injury.

 

WR Quintez Cephus: Being a fifth-round pick in a loaded draft class at receiver is certainly notable, but Cephus is probably just a dynasty prospect to start his career. The rookie—who ran just a 4.73 earlier this year—will try to pick up some tricks from Danny Amendola in the slot.

 

TE T.J. Hockenson: Typical rookie struggles quickly set in for Hockenson last season despite an historic debut (six receptions for 131 yards and a touchdown), so fantasy owners shouldn’t be at all discouraged about his outlook entering Year 2. If the No. 7 overall pick in the 2019 NFL Draft can stay healthy, he has no-doubt star potential in a group with several other young tight ends.

 

TE Jesse James: James was a decent part of the Pittsburgh offense from 2016 to 2018, but his receiving role was significantly decreased with the Lions (16 receptions for 142 scoreless yards in 16 games), and he should be a better real-life player than fantasy option in 2020.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB Kerryon Johnson (FantasyPros ADP: RB34)

Based on ADP, RB34 is a very reasonable slot for Johnson in redraft leagues, but going by the consensus ranking from the “experts” (RB42), he could be a steal this summer. There are a ton of backs set to be in a committee in the middle rounds, and we think Johnson has as much talent as any of them.

 

Best dynasty investment: RB Kerryon Johnson

Again, Johnson just turned 23, and staying healthy has been a bigger issue than ability through two seasons (he’s missed 14-of-32 games). The backfield should have enough touches for both he and Swift to be difference-makers, but if things don’t work out with the Lions this year, Johnson would still have plenty of time to establish himself elsewhere.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Denver Broncos

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Denver Broncos

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Drew Lock: After going 4-1 down the stretch last season to begin his NFL career, Lock is an exciting flier for those waiting on quarterback. From a fantasy perspective, not only did Denver add a bunch of talent this offseason, but they also hired offensive coordinator Pat Shurmur, which should be seen as a big plus for Lock’s development. Furthermore, people are overlooking that Lock has 4.69 wheels to do more damage as a runner in 2020. All the pieces are there for a breakout.

 

RB Melvin Gordon: The Broncos know what Gordon can do after facing him for the past four years in AFC West battles, and he should be the clear starter despite the fact that incumbent Phillip Lindsay is coming off another 1,000-yard season. The all-around skillset Gordon possesses—including as a receiver and pass blocker—should make him at least a high-end RB2 on a new team.

 

RB Phillip Lindsay: There might not be a player that’s seen a bigger decrease in fantasy value based on what happened in the offseason, but Lindsay still has talent and can beat expectations again. That said, Denver is loaded with offensive playmakers, and Lindsay could become somewhat of an afterthought for entire games if Gordon is featured. Consider him more of a target in the back half of fantasy drafts.

 

RB Royce Freeman: It would be a big surprise if there were enough touches for Freeman to have consistent fantasy value, and a trade would be his best shot of being clearly on the redraft radar by Week 1. Philadelphia comes to mind as a possible fit after they missed on Carlos Hyde.

 

WR Courtland Sutton: Sutton’s 2019 season was very impressive, but might there be more week-to-week volatility this year? For one, Jerry Jeudy is a prototype possession receiver/separator, and he wasn’t the only piece added on offense in the offseason. Also, the numbers for Sutton noticeably dropped when Drew Lock took over at quarterback (9.8 yards per target compared to 7.0 yards per target). With so many options at receiver throughout the league, Sutton could fall back towards FLEX status.

 

WR Jerry Jeudy: Having no exhibitions (and limited training camp) is something that could really impact the rookie wideouts as they transition to the NFL game, but Jeudy is at least a refined route runner that should have an easier time than most. The overall play style of Jeudy feels like a great fit for Shurmur’s offense, as he can create separation on short/intermediate routes from any receiver spot. For now, the rookie should be viewed as an excellent end-of-bench stash.

 

WR K.J. Hamler: The Broncos viewed Hamler favorably enough as a prospect to double down at receiver in the 2020 NFL Draft, and for good reason; at Penn State, Hamler was a gamebreaker with elite speed, and he should impact the game in a variety of ways on both offense and special teams. To start his career, the real-life impact will likely be more significant than the fantasy impact.

 

WR DaeSean Hamilton: Hamilton was unable to emerge last season as a popular breakout pick, and he projects to settle in as depth for an offense that is loaded with probably contributors. The former fourth-round pick shouldn’t be written off entering Year 3, but he isn’t worth selecting in redraft leagues with Jeudy and Hamler both set to see the field immediately.

 

TE Noah Fant: Fant averaged a healthy 14.1 yards per reception as a rookie, and if he can become more consistent, a jump is certainly possible despite all the options in Denver. It’s worth noting that Evan Engram was on pace for 88 receptions through eight games last year in Shurmur’s offense, and Fant has double-digit touchdown upside.

 

TE Albert Okwuegbunam: The best college season for Okwuegbunam came in 2018 when Drew Lock was his quarterback at Missouri, so that connection need to be mentioned for this season and beyond. However, Fant is the no-doubt TE1 for the Broncos, and rookies usually have a steep transition at the position. Okwuegbunam will only be on the streaming radar in the event of an injury.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB Melvin Gordon (FantasyPros ADP: RB17)

Gordon has seen his draft stock climb some with most realizing he will be Denver’s clear starter, but he still might be a little low outside the top 15 at running back (and top 30 overall). For the most part, the 27-year-old should be the team’s weekly focal-point and will see a bunch of favorable boxes if the receivers all live up to their potential.

 

Best dynasty investment: QB Drew Lock

You could argue that Lock has the best supporting cast in the league out of all the young quarterbacks that haven’t fully established themselves, and the coaching is also a benefit with Pat Shurmur being hired to coordinate the offense. Again, if Lock does more as a runner this season and can increase the aggressiveness some without getting into trouble like we saw in college, the ceiling is very high.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Dallas Cowboys

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Dallas Cowboys

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Dak Prescott: Coming off an overall QB2 finish last season, Prescott now adds No. 17 overall pick CeeDee Lamb and Super Bowl-winning head coach Mike McCarthy, so 2020 should be another huge year. It’s worth noting that Dak’s touchdown percentage has been at 5.0% or below in all four seasons since entering the league—which could be evidence that there is room for him to grow as a passer. Consider him a top-five quarterback worth considering in the first five rounds this summer.

 

RB Ezekiel Elliott: The Cowboys could slant more towards the pass under Mike McCarthy, but Elliott is a lock for 300+ touches if he stays healthy, and an improved overall offense should mean more scoring opportunities. Excluding the 2017 season when he was suspended, Zeke has averaged 309 carries, 1,474 rushing yards, and 11 rushing touchdowns per season; he’s a safe pick early in fantasy drafts.

 

RB Tony Pollard: Pollard averaged an impressive 5.3 yards per carry on 86 attempts as a rookie, but the workload probably isn’t big enough to make him a standalone option behind Ezekiel Elliott, so he should only be drafted as a premium handcuff on one of the league’s best offenses.

 

WR Amari Cooper: Being drafted as a WR1 by most, Cooper carries significant risk at his ADP, and he’s a tough player to recommended based on the up-and-down nature of his game. Perhaps the emergence of Michael Gallup and selection of CeeDee Lamb will allow him to be more consistent against softer coverage, but Cooper is better viewed as an upside WR2 with a lower weekly floor than you’d like.

 

WR Michael Gallup: Gallup somewhat quietly went for a 66/1,107/6 line last season (in just 14 games), and he really came on down the stretch with a 74/1,306/8 pace in the second half. The former third-round pick is a big-play possession receiver that can expand his role in the red zone, but we’ll see if the offense adding CeeDee Lamb impacts his numbers across the board and potentially leads to some inconsistency.

 

WR CeeDee Lamb: The Cowboys having Lamb fall into their laps earlier this year was a major surprise, and they have lofty expectations for him donning the No. 88 jersey. Remember, Mike McCarthy’s offense was able to support multiple receivers putting up numbers in Green Bay, so Lamb will immediately be on the fantasy radar as a FLEX option with huge upside if Cooper or Gallup ever goes down.

 

WRs Devin Smith and Cedrick Wilson: Projected reliance on 11 personnel makes Smith and Wilson worth monitoring as potential in-season pickups, but Dallas would likely lean more on their headliners if someone is injured. Based on his ability to get behind the defense, we would consider Smith the preferred option.

 

TE Blake Jarwin: Jarwin is being hyped up some as a breakout candidate with Jason Witten gone, but will there be enough targets for him to have reliable fantasy value? Someone like Chris Herndon or Eric Ebron might be a better low-end TE2 flier.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: None

This is in no way saying the Dallas offense will disappoint in 2020, but the price of everyone is at least a spot or two high from a positional and overall perspective, so it will take someone slipping to find value in drafts. Other than Ezekiel Elliott (top five), we’d say the players at least in a range worth targeting are Dak Prescott, Michael Gallup, and CeeDee Lamb.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Michael Gallup

Amari Cooper signing a $100-million extension and a heavy draft investment in CeeDee Lamb are depressing Gallup’s value a bit this offseason, so now could be the time to strike a deal for him in dynasty leagues. The Cowboys actually have the ability to get out of Cooper’s deal with somewhat limited cap implications as soon as next year, but no matter who is on the roster, Gallup can remain the 1B in a high-powered offense for years to come if he builds on his 2019 breakout.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 1.0 (12-team, 0.5 PPR)

2020 Fantasy Football Mock Draft 1.0 (12-team, 0.5 PPR)

On every Friday over the next several weeks, I am going to be doing various fantasy mock drafts with different formats using the FantasyPros draft simulator. First up is a 12-team, 0.5 PPR draft from the No. 11 spot.

 

Round 1

1.01: Christian McCaffrey, CAR RB
1.02: Saquon Barkley, NYG RB
1.03: Ezekiel Elliott, DAL RB
1.04: Alvin Kamara, NO RB
1.05: Michael Thomas, NO WR
1.06: Dalvin Cook, MIN RB
1.07: Derrick Henry, TEN RB
1.08: Davante Adams, GB WR
1.09: DeAndre Hopkins, ARI WR
1.10: Joe Mixon, CIN RB
1.11: Julio Jones, ATL WR
1.12: Tyreek Hill, KC WR

 

Thoughts: I would have liked for one of the elite running backs to fall, but you can’t go wrong with Julio Jones, and there are a few backs that I’d be happy with in Round 2.

 

Round 2

2.01: Nick Chubb, CLE RB
2.02: Josh Jacobs, LV RB
2.03: Kenyan Drake, ARI RB
2.04: Aaron Jones, GB RB
2.05: Miles Sanders, PHI RB
2.06: Lamar Jackson, BAL QB
2.07: Chris Godwin, TB WR
2.08: Mike Evans, TB WR
2.09: Austin Ekeler, LAC RB
2.10: Travis Kelce, KC TE
2.11: George Kittle, SF TE
2.12: Allen Robinson, CHI WR

 

Thoughts: The top-four picks in the second round (after Nick Chubb) were all players that deserved consideration, and I went with Josh Jacobs as a back that can push 300 carries if Las Vegas improves as a team in 2020.

 

Round 3

3.01: Patrick Mahomes, KC QB
3.02: Clyde Edwards-Helaire, KC RB
3.03: Kenny Golladay, DET WR
3.04: A.J. Brown, TEN WR
3.05: Todd Gurley, ATL RB
3.06: D.J. Moore, CAR WR
3.07: Amari Cooper, DAL WR
3.08: JuJu Smith-Schuster, PIT WR
3.09: Adam Thielen, MIN WR
3.10: Robert Woods, LAR WR
3.11: James Conner, PIT RB
3.12: Leonard Fournette, JAX RB

 

Thoughts: Pairing James Conner with Josh Jacobs gives the roster two clear feature backs, and people might be forgetting just how good the Pittsburgh offense can be when Ben Roethlisberger is on the field.

 

Round 4

4.01: Odell Beckham Jr., CLE WR
4.02: Chris Carson, SEA RB
4.03: Mark Andrews, BAL TE
4.04: David Johnson, HOU RB
4.05: Jonathan Taylor, IND RB
4.06: Melvin Gordon, DEN RB
4.07: Le’Veon Bell, NYJ RB
4.08: Cooper Kupp, LAR WR
4.09: D.J. Chark, JAX WR
4.10: Calvin Ridley, ATL WR
4.11: Terry McLaurin, WAS WR
4.12: Keenan Allen, LAC WR

 

Thoughts: I nearly went with Calvin Ridley to team up with Julio, but Chris Carson was a consideration for my previous pick, and having three bruisers should give the roster a solid floor at running back.

 

Round 5

5.01: Zach Ertz, PHI TE
5.02: Tyler Lockett, SEA WR
5.03: Courtland Sutton, DEN WR
5.04: D.K. Metcalf, SEA WR
5.05: David Montgomery, CHI RB
5.06: Devin Singletary, BUF RB
5.07: T.Y. Hilton, IND WR
5.08: DeVante Parker, MIA WR
5.09: D’Andre Swift, DET RB
5.10: Cam Akers, LAR RB
5.11: Darren Waller, LV RB
5.12: Mark Ingram, BAL RB

 

Thoughts: The value of Darren Waller here felt better than everyone else on the board, and I now have a big chunk of Jon Gruden’s offense with Henry Ruggs III hopefully opening things up for everyone.

 

Round 6

6.01: Dak Prescott, DAL QB
6.02: Kyler Murray, ARI QB
6.03: Stefon Diggs, BUF WR
6.04: Deshaun Watson, HOU QB
6.05: Hunter Henry, LAC TE
6.06: A.J. Green, CIN WR
6.07: Russell Wilson, SEA QB
6.08: Evan Engram, NYG TE
6.09: Tom Brady, TB QB
6.10: Raheem Mostert, SF RB
6.11: Marquise Brown, BAL WR
6.12: Tyler Boyd, CIN WR

 

Thoughts: I was hoping Dak Prescott would fall, but I felt a quarterback run coming and wanted one of Kyler Murray, Russell Wilson, or Deshaun Watson; eight signal-callers ended up coming off the board before my next selection.

 

Round 7

7.01: Kareem Hunt, CLE RB
7.02: Josh Allen, BUF QB
7.03: Matt Ryan, ATL QB
7.04: CeeDee Lamb, DAL WR
7.05: Drew Brees, NO QB
7.06: Ronald Jones II, TB RB
7.07: Deebo Samuel, SF WR
7.08: Carson Wentz, PHI QB
7.09: Jarvis Landry, CLE WR
7.10: Matthew Stafford, DET QB
7.11: Michael Gallup, DAL WR
7.12: Julian Edelman, NE WR

 

Thoughts: CeeDee Lamb surprisingly going ahead of Michael Gallup allows the No. 2 wideout for Dallas to fall into my lap, which gives me a phenomenal starting lineup; I didn’t set out to get all the starters in my first seven picks, but that’s how the board fell.

 

Round 8

8.01: Will Fuller, HOU WR
8.02: Brandin Cooks, HOU WR
8.03: Marvin Jones, DET WR
8.04: Ke’Shawn Vaughn, TB RB
8.05: Matt Breida, SF RB
8.06: John Brown, BUF WR
8.07: Kerryon Johnson, DET RB
8.08: James White, NE RB
8.09: Darius Slayton, NYG WR
8.10: Derrius Guice, WAS RB
8.11: J.K. Dobbins, BAL RB
8.12: Damien Williams, KC RB

 

Thoughts: I’m now a bit angry about not selecting Deshaun Watson over Kyler Murray, but getting Brandin Cooks in the eighth round is a great value, as he’s a No. 1 receiver on an explosive offense.

 

Round 9

9.01: Tevin Coleman, SF RB
9.02: Diontae Johnson, PIT WR
9.03: Jordan Howard, MIA RB
9.04: N’Keal Harry, NE WR
9.05: Sony Michel, NE RB
9.06: Darrell Henderson, LAR RB
9.07: Christian Kirk, ARI WR
9.08: Tarik Cohen, CHI RB
9.09: Jamison Crowder, NYJ WR
9.10: Breshad Perriman, NYJ WR
9.11: Sterling Shepard, NYG WR
9.12: Emmanuel Sanders, NO WR

 

Thoughts: I believe Sterling Shepard is the last No. 1 wideout to come off the board after a couple of Jets were drafted, and the WR2 spot can be comfortably mixed-and-matched depending on matchups.

 

Round 10

10.01: Mike Williams, LAC WR
10.02: Henry Ruggs III, LV WR
10.03: Phillip Lindsay, DEN RB
10.04: Golden Tate, NYG WR
10.05: Latavius Murray, NO RB
10.06: Marlon Mack, IND RB
10.07: Zack Moss, BUF RB
10.08: Boston Scott, PHI RB
10.09: Tony Pollard, DAL RB
10.10: Anthony Miller, CHI WR
10.11: Alexander Mattison, MIN RB
10.12: Mecole Hardman, KC WR

 

Thoughts: This is admittedly early for Henry Ruggs III to come off the board (and I could have used another running back), but the double-digit rounds are when you can start to take a gamble or two, and the roster is balanced enough that I can risk adding the rookie to my Las Vegas core.

 

Round 11

11.01: Duke Johnson, HOU RB
11.02: Jalen Reagor, PHI WR
11.03: 49ers, SF D/ST
11.04: Rob Gronkowski, TB TE
11.05: Robby Anderson, CAR WR
11.06: Preston Williams, MIA WR
11.07: Jerry Jeudy, DEN WR
11.08: Justin Jefferson, MIN WR
11.09: Curtis Samuel, CAR WR
11.10: DeSean Jackson, PHI WR
11.11: Aaron Rodgers, GB QB
11.12: Tyler Higbee, LAR TE

 

Thoughts: Quarterback and tight end looked like the clear best values on the board, and I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to add Aaron Rodgers as a backup plan if Kyler Murray doesn’t make a Year 2 leap.

 

Round 12

12.01: Steelers, PIT D/ST
12.02: Chase Edmonds, ARI RB
12.03: Cam Newton, NE QB
12.04: Anthony McFarland Jr., PIT RB
12.05: Daniel Jones, NYG QB
12.06: Alshon Jeffery, PHI WR
12.07: Darrynton Evans, TEN RB
12.08: Ryan Tannehill, TEN QB
12.09: Nyheim Hines, IND RB
12.10: Adrian Peterson, WAS RB
12.11: Ravens, BAL D/ST
12.12: Brandon Aiyuk, SF WR

 

Thoughts: Not drafting a running back since the fourth round has the depth options really lacking, but Chase Edmonds is a top handcuff that can hopefully have some standalone value in Kliff Kingsbury’s offense.

 

Round 13

13.01: Joshua Kelley, LAC RB
13.02: Antonio Gibson, WAS RB
13.03: Sammy Watkins, KC WR
13.04: Jared Cook, NO TE
13.05: Jamaal Williams, GB RB
13.06: Noah Fant, DEN TE
13.07: Austin Hooper, CLE TE
13.08: Damien Harris, NE RB
13.09: T.J. Hockenson, DET TE
13.10: Carlos Hyde, SEA RB
13.11: A.J. Dillon, GB RB
13.12: Rashaad Penny, SEA RB

 

Thoughts: Remember, you don’t need to handcuff your players (running backs on other teams have the same chance of getting injured), so A.J. Dillon rounds out the position as another upside pick behind Jacobs/Conner/Carson.

 

Round 14

14.01: Justin Jackson, LAC RB
14.02: Hayden Hurst, ATL TE
14.03: John Ross, CIN WR
14.04: Ryquell Armstead, JAX RB
14.05: Jonnu Smith, TEN TE
14.06: Justice Hill, BAL RB
14.07: Michael Pittman Jr., IND WR
14.08: Jack Doyle, IND TE
14.09: Giovani Bernard, CIN RB
14.10: Joe Burrow, CIN QB
14.11: Ben Roethlisberger, PIT QB
14.12: Patriots, NE D/ST

 

Thoughts: Multiple tight ends that I considered drafting earlier were still on the board, and Hayden Hurst should carry quality upside in a high-powered Atlanta offense.

 

Round 15

15.01: Mike Gesicki, MIA TE
15.02: Antonio Brown, FA WR
15.03: Chris Thompson, JAX RB
15.04: Bills, BUF D/ST
15.05: Saints, NO D/ST
15.06: Colts, IND D/ST
15.07: Justin Tucker, BAL K
15.08: Bears, CHI D/ST
15.09: Broncos, DEN D/ST
15.10: Rams, LAR D/ST
15.11: Chargers, LAC D/ST
15.12: Dallas Goedert, PHI TE

 

Round 16

16.01: Harrison Butker, KC K
16.02: Wil Lutz, NO K
16.03: Greg Zuerlein, LAR K
16.04: Matt Prater, DET K
16.05: Matt Gay, TB K
16.06: Vikings, MIN D/ST
16.07: Robbie Gould, SF K
16.08: Zane Gonzalez, ARI K
16.09: Jake Elliott, PHI K
16.10: Ka’imi Fairbairn, HOU K
16.11: Michael Badgley, LAC K
16.12: Mason Crosby, GB K

 

Full Roster

QB: Kyler Murray, ARI
RB: Josh Jacobs, LV
RB: James Conner, PIT
WR: Julio Jones, ATL
WR: Michael Gallup, DAL
TE: Darren Waller, LV
FLEX: Chris Carson, SEA RB
D/ST: Chargers, LAC
K: Wil Lutz, NO
BE: Brandin Cooks, HOU WR
BE: Sterling Shepard, NYG WR
BE: Henry Ruggs III, LV WR
BE: Aaron Rodgers, GB QB
BE: Chase Edmonds, ARI RB
BE: A.J. Dillon, GB RB
BE: Hayden Hurst, ATL TE

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Cleveland Browns

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Cleveland Browns

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Baker Mayfield: Mayfield barely finished as a top-20 quarterback last season on an offense that slanted way too much towards the passing game, and he seems to be getting overvalued now by those that want to believe in the ceiling that was missed in 2019. The bottom line is that Kevin Stefanski will implement a run-first offense built around Nick Chubb, and Mayfield will be a low-volume passer similar to Kirk Cousins in Minnesota last year. We’d recommended other late-round options.

 

RB Nick Chubb: The NFL’s quiet superstar at running back, Chubb rushed for nearly 1,500 yards last year, and he should again be in that range with the Browns finally committing to the run every week (unlike under Freddie Kitchens when they seemed to have little semblance of an offensive identity). Chubb should be deadly on zone runs after the offensive line was bolstered with two new starting tackles.

 

RB Kareem Hunt: Hunt’s role down the stretch last season might be a concern for Chubb’s outlook, but we think the new coaching staff will commit to the starter as their workhorse. The talented backup is said to be cross training with the wide receivers, so it’ll be interesting to see if there are enough weekly touches for Hunt to remain in play as a low-end RB2/FLEX play in 2020.

 

WR Odell Beckham Jr.: While many still view Beckham Jr. as a top-flight receiver, he hasn’t had more than 77 receptions, 1,052 yards, or six touchdowns in a season since 2016, and his first year in Cleveland didn’t go according to plan. That being said, we’d expect OBJ to be featured in a heavy play-action attack, and his explosiveness could get him back in the clear WR1 ranks if he and Mayfield are on the same page. The value has settled into a range that’s worth selecting him in.

 

WR Jarvis Landry: Aside from being the No. 2 receiver in a low-volume passing attack, Landry is also recovering from offseason hip surgery that leaves him in some doubt for the opener. Currently ranked as a top-30 option at the position ahead of some high-upside players like Will Fuller and Marquise Brown, Landry is probably overvalued in 2020.

 

WR Rashard Higgins: The biggest beneficiary of Landry’s recovery possibly bleeding into the season would be Higgins, but he has the same problem as most of the passing attack in that the volume isn’t expected to be high. Although he’s shown strong chemistry with Baker Mayfield, leaning on the tight ends will likely drain the value of Higgins this year.

 

WR Donovan Peoples-Jones: A sixth-round pick in the 2020 NFL Draft, Peoples-Jones has superb athleticism at six-foot-two, 212 pounds with 4.48 speed and a 44.5-inch vertical. Limited college production was reason for DPJ’s fall earlier this year, but he has the upside to eventually be a starter if he can clean up the route running.

 

TE Austin Hooper: Signed to a four-year, $42-million contract in free agency, Hooper will be a significant piece for the Browns, but will that lead to big-time fantasy value? There are already concerns about getting enough looks for Odell, Landry, and Hunt, so Hooper might end up being a better real-life player than fantasy option.

 

TE David Njoku: Njoku requested a trade this month after seeing the writing on the wall for his chances of becoming a star for the Browns (they signed Austin Hooper and drafted Harrison Bryant in the fourth round), and there are a few potential landing spots that would have him shoot up the rankings. If he remains in Cleveland, Njoku would be a low-floor option that probably needs a score to pay dividends for a spot start.

 

TE Harrison Bryant: The Browns didn’t spent an early Day 3 pick on Bryant for him to be their No. 3 tight end for long, and he could have a substantial role as a rookie if Njoku is traded. Still, he is a long-term investment that’s unlikely to have redraft value at a position that has a steep learning curve.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: RB Nick Chubb (FantasyPros ADP: RB8)

Being drafted as the RB8 is definitely fair for Chubb, but it’s tough to find a value on Cleveland’s roster, and you could argue that the consensus ranking of No. 13 overall is too low. If Kareem Hunt doesn’t cut into the workload too much, Chubb has a good chance to lead the league in rushing after he was passed by Derrick Henry in the final week last season.

 

Best dynasty investment: TE David Njoku

Whether it’s this year or in the future, Njoku is almost sure to be playing football somewhere else soon enough, and the former first-round pick has plenty of untapped potential having just turned 24 last week. Those making a dynasty investment in Cleveland’s roster should be targeting Njoku or Chubb.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Cincinnati Bengals

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Cincinnati Bengals

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Joe Burrow: The 2019 Heisman Trophy winner is coming off an historic season for LSU, and he figures to have a chance to immediately perform well and push for rookie quarterback records in Zac Taylor’s offense this season. With a very good supporting cast including Joe Mixon, A.J. Green, Tyler Boyd, John Ross, and second-round rookie receiver Tee Higgins—along with a Cincinnati offensive line that should be better than it was last year—Burrow landed in a good spot to put up numbers in his first NFL season. Fantasy quarterback is deep, and Burrow doesn’t have the benefit of a full offseason because of COVID-19, but it won’t be a surprise if Burrow becomes a solid startable fantasy option.

 

RB Joe Mixon: The talent for Mixon is undeniable, and he’ll obviously also benefit if the Bengals get improved play up front as expected this season. The former second-rounder is entering a contract year, so a) he’ll want to show he should get a lucrative long-term deal, and b) Cincinnati won’t be afraid to feed him the rock. Also keep in mind that Mixon is arguably the best player on the roster, so Zac Taylor needs to get the ball in his hands as he looks to ensure he gets more than two years leading an NFL squad.

 

RB Giovani Bernard: Ultimately, Bernard is likely to be a better real-life contributor for the Bengals than he is a fantasy asset, but the veteran running back could retain a role on passing downs if the coaching staff decides against keeping Mixon on the field more. Those in deep PPR leagues should consider rostering Bernard.

 

RBs Trayveon Williams and Rodney Anderson: Both Williams and Anderson are very talented backs, but they are mostly dynasty-league prospects only while stuck behind Mixon on the depth chart. Anderson is coming off a torn ACL, and the Bengals are likely to take things slow with him. Williams might be the true handcuff to Mixon, so he’s someone to watch in redraft leagues.

 

WR A.J. Green: It feels like forever since Green has been on the field after half of his 2018 campaign was wiped out and he missed all of last year due to injury, and people might be forgetting that he’s an exceptional talent. Yes, Green will be 32 this season, but perhaps he’ll be fresh, rejuvenated, and healthy as he looks to earn a long-term contract while playing 2020 on the franchise tag. The Pro Bowl wideout offers WR1 upside in the middle of fantasy drafts.

 

WR Tyler Boyd: The Bengals paid Boyd ahead of last summer, indicating they saw him as an ideal fit in Taylor’s offense. The Pitt product is coming off back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons, and he profiles as a target that Burrow might be comfortable targeting, so he figures to offer a safe floor and value as a mid-round fantasy pick. However, the upside could be somewhat limited as the likely third option on a rookie-led offense behind Mixon and Green.

 

WR John Ross: There will always be major boom potential for Ross because of his elite speed (and he’s shown he can find the end zone in the NFL), but he’s more of a late-round lottery ticket given that he’ll likely be a third receiver that could get a push from Tee Higgins for playing time.

 

WR Tee Higgins: Higgins easily could have been a first-round selection in the NFL draft earlier this year, and the big target has a chance to force his way onto the field as a rookie. But keep in mind the shortened offseason and the strength on the depth chart for Cincinnati—Higgins might need an injury to be a consistent fantasy option in 2020 redraft leagues.

 

WR Auden Tate: Tate showed promising flashes and had a mini breakout last season with 40 receptions for 575 yards and a touchdown, but he’s unfortunately in a tough spot as he looks to build on his 2019 effort. Tate might be in a rotational role, which makes him difficult to recommend as a fantasy option.

 

TE Drew Sample: Cincinnati took Sample in the second-round last year, and there is some upside there if he gets a larger role than expected. However, he’s likely to make more of an impact as a blocker than a receiver.

 

TE C.J. Uzomah: The Bengals offense is likely to run through Mixon and the receivers, so Uzomah is likely to have a tough time becoming a fantasy contributor while working in tandem with Sample at tight end.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR A.J. Green (FantasyPros ADP: WR29)

Green and Boyd are currently right next to each other in average draft position, but Green gets the edge for best value among Bengals players because he theoretically still has top-five upside while Boyd’s ceiling probably falls outside the top-ten. A player of Green’s caliber sometimes falling toward the second half of fantasy drafts is definitely considered a potential value selection.

 

Best dynasty investment: RB Joe Mixon

Burrow has a case here, but Mixon already has three NFL seasons under his belt and is set to turn just 24 later this month. He has a fan in Patriots head coach Bill Belichick, who says Mixon is probably the best running back in football, and similar sentiment might be felt around the league. His position can be unforgiving, but Mixon could be a workhorse runner—for the Bengals or someone else—for the next five-to-seven years.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

The 2020 Fantasy Consigliere Draft Guide Is Now Available

The 2020 Fantasy Consigliere Draft Guide Is Now Available

As NFL training camps begin and August nears, fantasy football season will soon be in full swing. This year’s Fantasy Consigliere draft guide is bigger and better than the 2019 version (despite releasing nearly a month earlier), and the purpose of this article is to explain why the guide is a great resource to help dominate your fantasy league. For everyone that is already a part of the Fantasy Consigliere family, you can access the 2020 draft guide here.

 

Why You Should Get The Draft Guide

 

Wolf Sports is the most accurate and consistent fantasy football site in the industry. Over the past three FantasyPros accuracy competitions, we rank—by far—No. 1 overall in combined accuracy, and Wolf Sports has the only rankings to finish in the top 20 for 2018 Draft accuracy (#4 out of 154 “experts”), 2019 in-season accuracy (#17/129), and 2019 Draft accuracy (#12/162).

 

Using our rankings last season would have given you hits like Derrick Henry (No. 13 overall player) and Chris Godwin (No. 22 overall player); Wolf Sports was not only highest in the industry on them, but it wasn’t even close.

 

Here is what we said about Henry in last year’s draft guide:

 

Fantasy owners who stuck with Derrick Henry all season were likely rewarded with a fantasy championship if they played him in the playoffs, as in five December games, the monster runner was on pace for insane season-long stats of 310 carries for 2,000 yards and 26 touchdowns. That might seem completely unrealistic, but the numbers came on just 19.4 carries per game, and the Titans seem to know who their offense should run through in 2019. Tennessee feels they upgraded at both guard spots to bolster their already solid offensive line, so Henry—who finished as a top-15 option despite splitting carries for most of the 2018 season—has scary potential in a contract year.

 

Our projections (1,401 rushing yards and 13 rushing touchdowns) were seen as outlandish compared to the rest of the industry, but it turned out they were actually too low, as Henry rushed for 1,540 yards and 16 scores.

 

This year, we have even more rankings/projections that are outliers compared to the groupthink mindsets, and the draft guide will give you access to them.

 

2020 Player Outlooks & Projections Preview

 

We have hundreds of player outlooks and projections in the draft guide, and below are previews at quarterback, running back, and wide receiver.

 

Quarterback – Jimmy Garoppolo

 

 

Running back – Saquon Barkley

 

 

Wide receiver – Davante Adams

 

 

Overall Rankings

 

The draft guide will give fantasy owners access to our complete overall rankings for both 0.5 PPR/Standard leagues and Full PPR leagues, which will be continually updated through Fantasy Consigliere.

 

Bold Predictions And Stats To Know

 

After the outlooks, projections, and rankings, the draft guide ends with a couple of sections that can help provide even more insight ahead of drafts. Below are a couple of examples.

 

Bold Prediction 

 

 

Interesting Stat To Know For Each Team

 

 

 

For those that want to get the draft guide and everything else that comes with Fantasy Consigliere, use promo code JOINTHEPACK to join today. If you have any questions about joining, feel free to email us at contact@wolfsports.com.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Chicago Bears

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Chicago Bears

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide (scheduled to release on July 15) and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Nick Foles: Unless the Patriots plan to give Jarrett Stidham a realistic shot of starting, Chicago might have the only true quarterback competition in the league, and it will be interesting to see how COVID-19 impacts it. The familiarity that Foles has in Matt Nagy’s offense should put him on even footing with Mitchell Trubisky, and the weapons are there for whoever the starter is to put up numbers. Foles in particular fits well with the bigger personnel after the team added Jimmy Graham and Cole Kmet to an offense that already had Allen Robinson.

 

QB Mitchell Trubisky: Trubisky isn’t the pure passer that Foles is, but his dual-threat skillset could give him the edge as a playmaker—and potentially as a fantasy asset—that can create things for a defensive team. Also, Trubisky has built-in chemistry with most of the receivers, so he will be worth considering as a QB2 if named the starter, especially because the Bears have a very easy schedule this season.

 

RB David Montgomery: Chicago not adding any backfield competition for Montgomery is a great sign for his 2020 fantasy outlook, and he should be locked into at least around 250 touches with a real chance to push for 300+ touches. The RB24 ranking from the consensus might be Montgomery’s floor if he stays healthy.

 

RB Tarik Cohen: Cohen seemed like an easy candidate to decline some last year based on the rate at which he broke plays in 2018, and despite a career-high in targets (104) and receptions (79), he had just 5.8 yards per reception and 4.4 yards per target—compared to 10.2 yards per reception and 8.0 yards per target the prior year. Consider him a FLEX option with limited season-long upside.

 

WR Allen Robinson: The Bears wisely featured Robinson as their best offensive player last season, and he has the ability to blend the floor shown in 2019 with an even greater ceiling this year. One way or another, we’d expect Chicago will have improved quarterback play in the fall, so Robinson shouldn’t have as many big plays left on the field—lifting his ceiling even further.

 

WR Anthony Miller: Last year, a five-game sample size from Week 11 to Week 15 would have put Miller on a 16-game pace of 106 receptions, 1,379 yards, and six touchdowns, but can we trust the Bears to get him enough looks in 2020? The third-year receiver averaged just 3.0 targets per game outside the aforementioned hot streak, which obviously makes the floor lower than you’d like.

 

WR Ted Ginn Jr.: Matt Nagy’s offense was missing a prototype field-stretcher last year with Taylor Gabriel in and out of the lineup, and they signed Ginn Jr. to fill the role in 2020. The veteran will be tough to rely on as a weekly option, but desperate owners could do worse for a lottery ticket when in need of a big performance.

 

WR Javon Wims: He’s only caught 22 passes through two seasons, but Wims has flashed talent for Chicago, and an injury could make him worth a pickup in all leagues if he can hold off Riley Ridley for the No. 4 job. Wims brings physicality to the position at six-foot-two, 220 pounds.

 

WR Riley Ridley: Ridley only appeared in five games last year, but that might have had to do with a lack of value on special teams, and he can certainly make a jump to earn a bigger offensive role this fall. For now, consider him a dynasty stash.

 

TE Jimmy Graham: The size of Graham should make him an immediate factor in scoring territory, and Chicago likely has a defined role in mind after signing him to a healthy two-year, $16-million deal in free agency. Foles’ willingness to give his weapons a chance to make plays above the rim should make him the preferred option at quarterback for those who still believe in Graham entering his age-33/34 season.

 

TE Cole Kmet: The first tight end off the board in the 2020 NFL Draft, Kmet possesses 4.70 speed and underrated athleticism (37-inch vertical) in a physical, six-foot-six frame. Rookie tight ends rarely become significant contributors from a statistical perspective, though, so Kmet should rank outside the top 30 at the position and will probably need a touchdown to be worth a start for any given week.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Allen Robinson (FantasyPros ADP: WR10)

Being ranked and selected as a low-end WR1, Robinson has as good of a case as anyone to be the WR6 behind our clear top five (which is different than the consensus), so he could be a great value in the third round of drafts this summer. It’s worth noting that Robinson averaged a modest 11.7 yards per reception last season—and the number is at 14.0 for the rest of his career.

 

Best dynasty investment: TE Cole Kmet

We shouldn’t expect big numbers in 2020, but Kmet has the all-around skillset to eventually be one of the game’s best tight ends, and being more of a traditional option at the position should allow him to be a full-time player. Dynasty owners should watch the Georgia game from last season to see Kmet’s potential.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Carolina Panthers

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Carolina Panthers

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide (scheduled to release on July 15) and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Teddy Bridgewater: He has the reputation of being a conservative, low-volume passer, but Bridgewater might open things up this year in offensive coordinator Joe Brady’s spread attack, and it’s a system he has familiarity with because of the New Orleans roots. While pass protection might be a concern, Carolina should have enough playmakers for Bridgewater to get the ball out quickly and let them make something happen. He’s an underrated streamer.

 

RB Christian McCaffrey: The raw upside of Saquon Barkley could give you something to think about, but McCaffrey is probably the clear 1.01 in all formats after averaging 25.8 fantasy points per game last season. The Stanford product is basically an ironman that seems to never tire out or leave the field, and the Panthers didn’t add anyone to the backfield this offseason.

 

RBs Reggie Bonnafon, Mike Davis, and Jordan Scarlett: Running backs not named Christian McCaffrey totaled 28 touches last season, so Bonnafon, Davis, and Scarlett have little to no standalone value heading into 2020. If McCaffrey were to ever miss time, though, Bonnafon would be the favorite for touches and at least an upside RB2 with Davis potentially taking some short-yardage work.

 

WR D.J. Moore: The run Moore went on down the stretch last year likely helped many reach the fantasy championship, as he had at least 75 yards in seven straight games (Week 9 through Week 15)—with fantasy point totals of 13.6, 16.5, 13.5, 28.4, 16.2, 10.1, and 16.3. However, the offense is expected to be more of a spread-the-wealth attack this season, and Moore could settle in as a low-end WR2 as he shares targets with Curtis Samuel and Robby Anderson.

 

WR Curtis Samuel: We are still waiting on Samuel to fully breakout as a receiver (he caught just 51.4% of his targets and averaged 6.0 yards per target in 2019), but his big-play ability is undeniable, and a new system could be the recipe for him to turn into a star. Last summer, Samuel was apparently creating separation at will in joint practices, and Joe Brady should help him unlock his potential by getting the ball in his hands.

 

WR Robby Anderson: Anderson signed with the Panthers largely because his familiarity with head coach Matt Rhule (who coached him at Temple), and he should be a strong real-life addition as a field-stretcher on a young offense. That said, the projected volatility makes him a tough sell as anything more than a late-round flier, and the quiet weeks may outweigh the explosive ones.

 

WR Seth Roberts: Roberts was targeted just 35 times in 16 games last year with the Ravens, and he should settle in as the No. 4 wide receiver in Carolina. An injury would at least put the veteran on the radar in redraft leagues because the kind of offense the Panthers will run, but you should look elsewhere for now.

 

WR Keith Kirkwood: As a rookie, Kirkwood averaged 16.1 yards per reception and scored twice on 13 grabs with the Saints, but he missed basically the entire 2019 season with a hamstring injury and will now hope to rebound with another NFC South team. He is in the same boat as Roberts on the fringes of the fantasy radar.

 

TE Ian Thomas: Teddy Bridgewater didn’t put a priority on targeting tight ends last year with the Saints, and Thomas may struggle to become a consistent fantasy contributor on an offense that will revolve around Christian McCaffrey and the wideouts. We like the talent of the 24-year-old, but he took a step back in 2019; consider him a low-end TE2 option in deeper leagues.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: QB Teddy Bridgewater (FantasyPros ADP: QB27)

In five starts with the Saints last year, Teddy was on pace for 3,856 yards and a 29:6 touchdown-interception ratio—completing 69.7% of his passes over that span. The weapons and system in Carolina should allow Bridgewater to at least finish as a top-24 option at quarterback, so he looks like the best value on the team. For the streamers, Matt Rhule’s squad will notably have a couple of potential shootouts to open up against Las Vegas and Tampa Bay.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Curtis Samuel

Although he’s already entering his fourth season, Samuel won’t turn 24 until next month, and he still has big-time potential as an NFL playmaker. There is definite hope that a new offense will allow him to shine, but if that’s not the case, Samuel will get a chance to sign elsewhere as a free agent in 2021. Now is the time to invest if you believe in the talent.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Buffalo Bills

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Buffalo Bills

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide (scheduled to release on July 15) and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Josh Allen: Most analysts had Allen in the QB20-QB25 range last year, but we had him as the QB7, and he proved to be a steal as one of the best dual-threat quarterbacks in the league. Buffalo is expected to open things up even more this season, and Allen has fantasy MVP upside if the rushing numbers stay high after 17 touchdowns on the ground over the past two years. The big concern will be a tough playoff schedule (v PIT, @ DEN, @ NE, v MIA), but it’s too far out to weigh it heavily.

 

RB Devin Singletary: Singletary was trending way up based on how last season ended (on-pace for 300+ touches in the second half of the year), but the selection of Zack Moss to take carries away on early downs was a definite drain on his value. Now, the second-year back will probably need to have an expanded role as a receiver to be more than a low-end RB2 option, though running behind the same offensive line as a season ago will be a benefit.

 

RB Zack Moss: Buffalo spent similar draft capital on Moss (No. 89 overall) and Singletary (No. 74 overall), so could this immediately be a 50-50 split? It’s possible—and the team has said they want to give him Frank Gore’s role from 2019—but it would probably take Josh Allen scaling back his running near scoring territory for the rookie to have reliable FLEX value; the Bills only had four rushing touchdowns from their backs last year.

 

RB T.J. Yeldon: It will almost certainly be a two-man show if Singletary and Moss stay healthy, but Yeldon has flashed over the years and is worth monitoring. That said, he should start the season on the waiver wire after just 30 touches in six games for Buffalo in 2019.

 

WR Stefon Diggs: Diggs has a skillset that perfectly fits with Josh Allen’s game, as he will be able to create separation on all three levels of the field, and the duo working out together over the past few weeks (the entire offense has, for that matter) should help the transition when the real games begin. Those claiming a new receiver on a new team will lead to decreased production fail to mention both John Brown and Cole Beasley saw increased numbers last year.

 

WR John Brown: The acquisition of Diggs will push Brown to the No. 2 receiver role, but that doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad thing for his fantasy value. If Josh Allen improved his deep accuracy this season—which is a definite possibility after focusing on mechanics—“Smokey” could be a high-upside FLEX with an improved weekly ceiling. He’s a good target in the middle rounds.

 

WR Cole Beasley: A key contributor out of the slot last season, Beasley averaged a career-high 11.6 yards per reception and scored a career-high six touchdowns to finish as the WR34 in 0.5 PPR leagues, but Diggs pushing everyone down the depth chart might impact him more than anyone. While the trust built with Josh Allen could allow Beasley to stay afloat as a decent FLEX, there is likely more upside worth targeting for a late-round flier.

 

WR Gabriel Davis: The Bills spent a fourth-round pick on Davis, so they clearly believe in his long-term upside at receiver. To start his career, the rookie—who models himself after Odell Beckham Jr.—will be the No. 4 wideout at best, though, and he could be lower than that due to a shortened offseason.

 

WR Robert Foster: Foster looked on his way to being an undrafted gem after closing out his 2018 rookie campaign with 94+ yards in four of his final seven games, but he caught just three passes last year, and now he might need a change of scenery to hit his potential. Despite the chemistry shown with Josh Allen, a trade is Foster’s best chance of 2020 value.

 

WRs Duke Williams and Isaiah McKenzie: Additions made in the offseason could knock Williams and McKenzie completely out of the rotation, but they both played ahead of Foster last season, and perhaps they will have similar roles if Gabriel Davis takes some time to adjust to the NFL. Still, they wouldn’t see enough playing time to have significant fantasy value.

 

TE Dawson Knox: Although Knox flashed big-play potential as a rookie, he will really need Buffalo’s offense to explode to become a TE1 option, as Diggs, Brown, Beasley, and Singletary could all be ahead of him for targets. Fantasy owners are probably better off looking elsewhere in standard-sized leagues with plenty of options at the position.

 

TE Tyler Kroft: Another factor that could cloudy things for Knox is having Kroft healthy for a full season. The former third-round pick is still just 27, but even if he gets more opportunities in the passing game, it’s difficult to see him having much fantasy value; consider him a better real-life contributor.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Stefon Diggs (FantasyPros ADP: WR22)

The ADP is actually an appropriate range for Diggs because of how stacked receiver is, so this is about the “expert” rankings more than that—as Buffalo’s newest wideout is the WR27 according to the consensus. The connection between Josh Allen and Diggs on broken plays projects to be one of the best in football, so it should be fun to watch them play together in 2020.

 

Best dynasty investment: QB Josh Allen

Allen remains arguably the most disrespected player in the league, but he took the Bills to the playoffs in his first full year as a starter, and he’s far ahead of schedule for those that called him a developmental quarterback (or worse) when he entered the league. If you’re in a dynasty league where Allen isn’t appreciated, trade for him before Buffalo opens things up this fall.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Baltimore Ravens

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Baltimore Ravens

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide (scheduled to release on July 15) and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Lamar Jackson: Coming off an MVP season and bolt to fantasy superstardom, Jackson is hoping to be even better—particularly as a passer—in 2020. The Ravens will again be built on their diverse rushing attack, but Jackson improving as a downfield, outside-the-numbers thrower could take his upside to a new level, and the weapons are in place with Marquise Brown healthy and a couple of rookies being added to the mix. Jackson is worth considering very early in all formats this summer.

 

RB Mark Ingram: Ingram scored 15 touchdowns last year on his way to a top-eight fantasy finish, but can we expect a repeat this season? Baltimore apparently had J.K. Dobbins as their top running back in the 2020 class, and they may want to dial back the workload of the veteran starter with some capable options behind him. At his top-50 ADP, Ingram could disappoint after career-best efficiency and touchdown numbers.

 

RB J.K. Dobbins: The game log for Dobbins at Ohio State looks like something you would see in a video game, and he should immediately have a role on the league’s best rushing attack this season. However, the Ravens sound like they want to use all four backs on the roster, so Dobbins may have more quiet weeks than you’d like from a guy you will have to spend a mid-round pick on based on the hype.

 

RB Gus Edwards: Through two seasons, Edwards has rushed 270 times for 1,429 yards (5.3 YPC) and four touchdowns, so Baltimore is highly unlikely to go away from him in favor of an Ingram/Dobbins tandem. The 238-pound power back would probably need an injury ahead of him to have any reliable fantasy value as a standalone option after eight or fewer touches in 75% of his games last year.

 

RB Justice Hill: Hill was a popular late-round stash last year, but he never really got an opportunity outside of garbage time with just 58 carries in 16 games. Although John Harbaugh apparently wants to get last year’s fourth-round pick involved this season, it’s difficult to recommend him again as the No. 4 runner on the depth chart.

 

WR Marquise Brown: Brown exploded onto the scene with a 4/147/2 line in his career debut—on just 14 snaps—but he was never fully healthy as a rookie following a foot injury that required surgery at the end of his Oklahoma career. Now, “Hollywood” has bulked up some and should be 100%, so he is a great mid-round target in a passing attack that should open up with more downfield shots.

 

WR Miles Boykin: The No. 2 receiver spot looks wide open, but if the Ravens want to be more explosive, Boykin would seem to be the favorite at six-foot-four with 4.42 speed and a 43.5-inch vertical. The former Notre Dame standout averaged 15.2 yards per reception and scored three times on 13 grabs last year; he should be a quality late-round flier in 0.5 PPR/standard formats.

 

WR Willie Snead: He scored five touchdowns, but Snead caught just 31 passes for 339 yards as a starter last year, and he was held to 22 or fewer yards in the final 11 games of the regular season. The selections of Devin Duvernay and James Proche could eventually push Snead out of the rotation, so he’s not a recommended fantasy option.

 

WR Devin Duvernay: Duvernay will bring more speed to the receiving corps, but it will mostly come out of the slot where he also provides toughness and reliable hands. The volume might not be there for Duvernay to become a consistent fantasy factor, though, especially if COVID-19 gives the edge to Willie Snead for playing time because of his experience.

 

WR James Proche: The Ravens selecting Proche in the sixth round sounded like a case of best player available, and it will be interesting to see how the playing time is distributed in 2020 and beyond for a young group of wideouts. This year, Proche could simply be depth (and potentially the team’s punt returner), but keep tabs on him if he works his way onto the field on offense.

 

TE Mark Andrews: One of the league’s best touchdown and big-play threats at the position, Andrews scored ten times last year to finish as the overall TE2 behind just Travis Kelce, and he has a strong case to lead the tier just below Kelce and George Kittle. The concern will be trips to the end zone declining (and more targets for the receivers), but Andrews has great chemistry with Lamar Jackson all over the field.

 

TE Nick Boyle: Baltimore’s top blocking tight end, Boyle could see a slightly expanded receiving role with Hayden Hurst now in Atlanta, but it’s more likely that the receivers will be more involved instead. The 27-year-old is a better real-life player than fantasy option.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: WR Marquise Brown (FantasyPros ADP: WR32)

The Ravens are mostly valued very high after the offense look the league by storm in 2019, but Brown’s upside should give him a good chance to beat his current ADP and consensus ranking (WR33). The speedster had just one game with 80% of the offensive snaps played last year, so being healthy should allow him to stay on the field.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR James Proche

Proche is extremely cheap as a sixth-round pick on a run-first offense, but based on talent, he can be a real difference-maker down the line. The SMU product has perhaps the best hands in the entire rookie class, and he put up big-time numbers as mostly a perimeter receiver in college—which should bode well for his ability to get open at the next level.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Atlanta Falcons

2020 Team Fantasy Preview: Atlanta Falcons

For more in-depth outlooks with rankings and projections, get the Fantasy Consigliere draft guide (scheduled to release on July 15) and much more using promo code JOINTHEPACK.

 

Player Outlooks (2020)

 

QB Matt Ryan: Ryan remains squarely in his prime as one of the best quarterback’s in football, and Atlanta’s weapons should be better than ever with Todd Gurley joining Julio Jones and Calvin Ridley. The Falcons will likely have to get in shootouts to compete in the NFC South, so Matty Ice is an overlooked QB1 option in the middle rounds with a very favorable schedule—particularly down the stretch.

 

RB Todd Gurley: The health of Gurley’s knee is again a mystery, but he only missed one game in 2019 when it was the storyline of the summer, and playing deep into the Rams’ 45-6 loss to the Ravens on Monday Night Football last November seemed to be a sign that perhaps it’s been overblown. With touchdown totals of 19, 21, and 14 over the past three years, Gurley is one of the league’s best “scorers” and should get ample opportunities in Atlanta.

 

RB Ito Smith: Limited to just 33 touches in seven games last year, Smith isn’t guaranteed to be the Falcons’ No. 2 back this season, but it will be interesting to see how many touches are available behind Gurley. In the event of an injury, Atlanta would probably go with a three-man committee (and more passing), so Smith doesn’t need to be rostered as a handcuff.

 

RB Brian Hill: Hill is in the same boat as Smith, but he might carry a bit more upside as a runner—potentially making him the better pure handcuff. That said, Hill rushed 44 times for just 105 yards (2.4 YPC) in three games with at least 50% of the offensive snaps played last season.

 

RB Qadree Ollison: A fifth-round pick in the 2019 NFL Draft, Ollison brings the power to Atlanta’s group of backups at six-foot-one, 232 pounds—and he might be the guy we end up recommending most if Gurley ever misses time. With everyone healthy, though, it would be a shock if Ollison was able to claim goal-line carries.

 

WR Julio Jones: It looked like Jones was going to be an absolute monster last season when he scored four times in the first three games, but he unfortunately had just two touchdowns for the rest of the year. Still, he finished as the overall WR3 with a 99/1,394/6 line in 15 games, and there is no doubt that Jones has the potential to reach double-digit scores for the first time since 2012 if given enough chances. He’s worth a top-ten pick in 0.5 PPR leagues.

 

WR Calvin Ridley: Ridley is one of the league’s best route runners and will see plenty of single coverage alongside Julio Jones, so he should be viewed as a high-upside WR2 in redraft leagues. Through two years, Ridley has averaged 9.1 yards per target, and he will hopefully get into the triple-digits in his third season—which is oftentimes when wideouts really hit their stride.

 

WR Russell Gage: The Falcons declined to add depth to the receiver room through April’s draft, so Gage is in position to have a role on opening day—putting him on the radar in all formats. Over the final nine weeks last year, Gage quietly averaged 7.3 targets per game; the concern will be Todd Gurley and Hayden Hurst potentially taking a bigger target share.

 

WR Laquon Treadwell: Atlanta signing Treadwell is mainly them taking a flier on a former first-round pick, but that doesn’t mean it won’t pan out (look at Breshad Perriman last year in Tampa Bay). The Ole Miss product just turned 25 last month, and he will get a great example to look up to in Julio Jones. If an injury hits, Treadwell would be an intriguing pickup.

 

TE Hayden Hurst: Austin Hooper leaving in free agency vacates 97 targets (which he turned into 75 receptions for 787 yards and six touchdowns) on offense, but it’s not crazy to think Atlanta might have upgraded the position by trading for Hurst. At worst, the former Raven will bring more explosiveness at tight end, and there will be plenty of space down the seams with Jones and Ridley on the outside.

 

Other Notes

 

Best 2020 value: TE Hayden Hurst (FantasyPros ADP: TE13)

Hurst ranked sixth among all tight ends in yards per target last season (8.9), and he’s been working to get on the same page with Matt Ryan this offseason to help the transition to a new team. The headliners of the passing attack didn’t stop Austin Hooper from finishing as a top-seven option in 2019, so Hurst has a legitimate case to be drafted in that range if you believe in the talent.

 

Best dynasty investment: WR Julio Jones 

The entire Atlanta offense might actually be undervalued in dynasty leagues, but none more so than Jones, who should remain a high-end WR1 for at least a couple of more years but is unbelievably ranked as a midrange WR2 by most. Everyone who doesn’t have Julio should at least make an inquiry to see what it would take to get him.

 

Bold prediction

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.

 

Stat to know

Exclusively in Fantasy Consigliere draft guide.